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Wednesday, November 1
 

08:30

Innovation150: Lessons learned on pan-organizational outreach collaborations/ Innovation150 : leçons tirées sur les collaborations en matière de sensibilisation à l’échelle des organisations
Organized by Innovation150
For Canada’s 150th anniversary, five of the country’s leading science research and outreach organizations came together to form Innovation150, a unique partnership to inspire Canadian innovators and help build fundamental STEM skills coast to coast to coast. 

Supported by the Department of Canadian Heritage, Innovation150 is led by Perimeter Institute, in collaboration with Actua, the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, the Canadian Association of Science Centres, and the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation. 
In this symposium, leaders from each organization will share the lessons they learned in teaming up to deliver this high-visibility, national outreach initiative that’s engaging millions of Canadian youth and their families. The session will focus on:
  • Aligning different organizations under a common vision
  • Strategies for targeting and tailoring science outreach to very diverse audiences across Canada through in-person, online and legacy-driven activities
  • Creating an infrastructure of open collaboration that encourages regional partners to participate, enhance, and benefit from the project
  • Structuring pan-organizational partnerships for success, including governance, sponsorship, and marketing communications
  • Recommendations for future science outreach initiatives
Filled with candid discussion, interactive opportunities, and anecdotes from Flin Flon to Arctic Bay, we invite you to explore ways to leverage models like Innovation150 to increase the reach and impact of future public engagement initiatives in Canada and beyond.
Innovation150 is a partnership supported by the Department of Canadian Heritage between Perimeter Institute, Actua, the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, the Canadian Association of Science Centres, and the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Campbell

Andrew Campbell

Senior Executive Director, Canada 150 Federal Secretariat
Andrew Campbell became Executive Director of the Canada 150 Federal Secretariat at the Department of Canadian Heritage on October 20, 2014. Since 2009, Andrew was the Vice-President of External Relations and Visitor Experience at Parks Canada. Prior to that, Andrew was the Agency’s... Read More →
avatar for Sandra Corbeil

Sandra Corbeil

Director, Strategic Partnerships and Networks, Ingenium
Sandra Corbeil is the Director Strategic Partnerships and Networks for Ingenium - Canada's Museums of Science and Innovation. A leader in building collaboration and a passionate activist for the integration of social, dynamic, participatory experiences into cultural institutions... Read More →
avatar for Tobi Day-Hamilton

Tobi Day-Hamilton

Director, Communications and Strategic Initiatives, Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo
In her role at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), Tobi has the pleasure of working alongside some of the world’s leading quantum information scientists to envision what a world with quantum technologies will look like and how best to share that vision with both private and... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Deschenes

Stephanie Deschenes

Executive Director, Canadian Association of Science Centres
Stephanie Deschenes is the Executive Director for the Canadian Association of Science Centres,a member-based organization representing 50 science centres, science museums, Planetariums and aquariums across Canada. Ms. Deschenes is responsible for government advocacy, partnership development... Read More →
avatar for Greg Dick

Greg Dick

Director of Educational Outreach, Perimeter Institute
Greg leads a passionate team of scientific communicators and educators who create and deliver engaging programming across the nation and internationally. Outreach activities include special events held at various locations, on-site science camps at Perimeter, interactive online content... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Flanagan

Jennifer Flanagan

Co-Founder, President and CEO, Actua
Jennifer Flanagan is the co-founder and President and CEO of Actua, a national charitable organization that engages Canadian youth in inspiring and innovative science and technology experiences. Through camps, classroom workshops, clubs, and community outreach, Actua's programs reach... Read More →
avatar for RJ Taylor

RJ Taylor

Manager of Special Projects, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
RJ is currently at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, where he leads marketing and strategic partnerships for Innovation150, a nationwide program engaging youth and families in science for Canada’s 150th anniversary. RJ’s career in science education and outreach... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 08:30 - 12:00
TRILLIUM BALLROOM Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

08:30

Science Policy 101/ Politique scientifique 101
Organized by CSPC
Curious about science policy? Whether trying to make a difference or demonstrating impact to funders, the need to engage effectively with policy- makers are increasingly part of the research endeavour. But even many of the most experienced research faculty balk at the barriers to bringing their research to the decision-table. For early career researchers and graduate students, the barriers are even higher – as are the rewards.
This workshop will provide a gateway into the world of science policy. You will gain an understanding of what science policy is and how it works through a morning of interactive exercises and discussion. We welcome active participants from all backgrounds, whether in the sciences, engineering, public policy, and administration, business, communications, arts or something else entirely. With an interest in science policy, this workshop is the place to share and expand knowledge, develop skills, and start building a network of interesting people in the world of science policy.

Science Policy 101 workshop agenda
8:30 - 9:00 Welcome and icebreaker (Jeff Kinder)
9:00 - 10:00 Introduction to Science Policy (Jeff Kinder)
10:00 - 10:15 Health break
10:15 – 11:15 Science for Policy Exercise (Silke Nebel)
11:15 - 12:00 Panel: “How YOU can get involved in science policy”
Panel members: Jeff Kinder, Silke Nebel, Kori St-Cyr, Brooke Struck

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Kinder

Jeff Kinder

Director, Innovation Lab, Institute on Governance
Jeff has almost 30 years of experience in government science and innovation policy in the US and Canada. His US experience includes the National Science Foundation, the National Academies and the Naval Research Laboratory.  In Canada, Jeff has worked at Industry Canada, Natural... Read More →
avatar for Silke Nebel

Silke Nebel

Science to Action Consulting, Principal
Silke Nebel holds a PhD in Biology and has published over 30 peer-reviewed papers. Before moving to London, Ontario, she did research on bird migration at research institutions in Canada, Panama, the Netherlands, and Australia. She currently teaches science policy at the graduate... Read More →
avatar for Kori St-Cyr

Kori St-Cyr

Senior Advisor, Science Strategies, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Kori St-Cyr is a science strategy and knowledge translation professional committed to working at the interface of science, partnership development and public policy. | As a Senior Advisor with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Kori provides strategic leadership and advice... Read More →
avatar for Brooke Struck

Brooke Struck

Policy Analyst, Science-Metrix Inc.
Brooke Struck is the main policy analyst at Science-Metrix, a firm specialising in the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of research & innovation programs. His main role is to translate between the technical and methodological dimensions and the policy context at hand, ensuring... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 08:30 - 12:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

08:30

The Next 150 years of Science in Canada: Embedding Equity, Delivering Diversity/ Les 150 prochaines années de sciences au Canada : Intégrer l'équité, promouvoir la diversité
Organizer: Dr. Imogen Coe, Ryerson University

Enhancing equity, diversity, and inclusivity (EDI) in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) has been described as being a human rights issue and an economic development issue by various individuals and organizations (e.g. OECD). Recent federal policy initiatives in Canada have focused on increasing participation of women (a designated under-represented group) in science through increased reporting, program changes, and institutional accountability.  However, the Employment Equity Act requires employers to act to ensure the full representation of the three other designated groups: Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities. Significant structural and systemic barriers to full participation and employment in STEM for members of these groups still exist in Canadian institutions.  Since data support the positive role of diversity in promoting innovation and economic development, failure to capture the full intellectual capacity of a diverse population limits provincial and national potential and progress in many areas.  A diverse international panel of experts from designated groups will speak to the issue of accessibility and inclusion in STEM.  In addition, the discussion will focus on evidence-based recommendations for policy initiatives that will promote full EDI in science in Canada to ensure local and national prosperity and progress for Canada over the next 150 years.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Imogen Coe

Dr. Imogen Coe

Professor; Dean, Faculty of Science, Ryerson University
Dr. Imogen Coe is the founding Dean of the Faculty of Science, Professor at Ryerson University, and an affiliate scientist in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Keenan Research Centre at St. Michael’s Hospital. In addition to being a research scientist and academic leader... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Shohini Ghose

Dr. Shohini Ghose

Founding Director, Centre for Women in Science, Wilfrid Laurier University
Shohini Ghose is a Professor of Physics and Computer Science and founding Director of the Centre for Women in Science at Wilfrid Laurier University. She is a theoretical physicist who examines how the laws of quantum physics can be harnessed to transform computation and communication... Read More →
avatar for Melanie Goodchild

Melanie Goodchild

Research Associate, Waterloo Institute for Social Innovation and Resilience (WISIR), University of Waterloo
Melanie Goodchild, moose clan, is from Biigtigong Nishnaabeg and Ketegaunseebee First Nations in northern Ontario.  She earned an Honours Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degree in Sociology from Lakehead University and is currently completing her PhD in Social and Ecological... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Lappin-Scott

Hilary Lappin-Scott

Senior Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Swansea University
Professor Hilary Lappin-Scott is the Senior Pro-Vice-Chancellor and a member of the Senior Management team at Swansea University, leading for Research and Innovation and Strategic Development. Prof Lappin-Scott was elected Vice President of the prestigious Federation of European... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Mahadeo Sukhai

Dr. Mahadeo Sukhai

Head of Research, CNIB
Dr. Mahadeo Sukhai is the world’s first congenitally blind biomedical research scientist. Mahadeo is the incoming Head of Research for the CNIB, having previously served as a research scientist at the University Health Network in Toronto. Dr. Sukhai is the Principal Investigator... Read More →
avatar for Luc Villeneuve

Luc Villeneuve

Canada Country Manager and General Manager, Red Hat Canada
As Canada Country Manager and General Manager for Red Hat Canada, Luc Villeneuve is chartered with helping to build a customer-centric team singularly focused on helping Fortune 500 companies best leverage and exploit the innovation from enterprise Open Source technology. With over... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 08:30 - 12:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

08:30

The role of academic research in the development of highly qualified personnel/ Le rôle de la recherche universitaire dans le développement d’un personnel hautement qualifié
Organized by Queens University
The role of academic research in the development of highly qualified personnel hosted by Dr. Art McDonald and Dr. Daniel Woolf

The highly qualified personnel, identified as individuals with university degrees at the bachelors' level and above, end up being very valuable people for our society in general. The Fundamental Science Review demonstrated that Canada’s research competitiveness has been eroded by lack of support for individual researchers, and for Higher Education Research and Development there has been a decline in the proportion of federally derived funding.

Moderators
avatar for Ted Hsu

Ted Hsu

Former Member, Canadian House of Commons
Ted Hsu (pronounced “shoe”) lives in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. A former Member of the Canadian House of Commons, Ted has also worked as a research physicist and business manager. He currently advocates for the place of science and innovation in government and society. With... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Cathleen Crudden

Cathleen Crudden

Tier 1 Chair in Metal Organic Chemistry, Queen's University
Cathleen Crudden was born in Belfast, N. Ireland to Patrick and Linda Crudden. Shortly thereafter, her family emmigrated to Canada, where they settled in Toronto and gave Cathleen two younger sisters, Mary and Sarah, and her only brother, Patrick. Cathleen grew up in Toronto attending... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Marc Fortin

Dr. Marc Fortin

Vice-President, Research Partnerships Directorate, NSERC
Dr. Marc Fortin is the Assistant Deputy Minister (Science and Technology) (ADM(S&T)) of the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC). In his capacity as ADM(S&T), Dr. Fortin oversees DND's S&T investment... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Art McDonald

Dr. Art McDonald

Professor Emeritus, Queen’s University, Nobel Laureate (physics 2015)
Arthur B. McDonald Art McDonald, CC, O. Ont, O. N.S., FRS, FRSC, P. Eng, is a native of Sydney, N.S. Canada. He has degrees in physics from Dalhousie University (BSc, MSc) and Caltech (PhD) and twelve honorary degrees. From 1969-1982 he was a Research Officer at AECL Chalk River... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Sean Mercer

Dr. Sean Mercer

Environmental R&D Program Leader, Imperial Oil
Sean Mercer is the Environmental R&D program leader within the Applied Process Research section of Sarnia Technology Applications & Research (STAR). STAR is one of Imperial’s two research facilities and is the largest facility of its kind in Canada. Sean began his career with Imperial... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Lisa Powell

Dr. Lisa Powell

Distinguished Professor and Director, Health Policy and Administration, University of Illinois in Chicago
Lisa M. Powell, Ph.D. is a Distinguished Professor and Director in the Division Health Policy and Administration in the School of Public Health and Director of the Illinois Prevention Research Center in the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at... Read More →
avatar for Dan Sinai

Dan Sinai

Senior Executive, Innovation, IBM Canada
A graduate of the University of Waterloo, Dan has held various key research administration positions with both the Government of Ontario and the Government of Canada. He also has extensive R&D program and policy experience, and has worked for several high technology companies, including... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Vincent-Herscovici

Jesse Vincent-Herscovici

Acting Vice-President, Business Development, Mitacs Inc.
Jesse’s interest in evolutionary; neuro and organizational Psychology was the motivation behind his obtaining a graduate degree, while keeping one foot in the private sector. Through his involvement in a breadth of industries ranging from telecommunications and micro-electronic... Read More →
DW

Daniel Woolf

After earning his doctorate at Oxford University (DPhil’83), Dr. Woolf returned to Queen’s in 1984 as a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) postdoctoral fellow in history. His teaching career took him from Queen’s to Bishop’s University, before he joined... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 08:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

12:00

13:00

Artificial Intelligence and Discovery Science: Playing to Canada’s Strengths/ Intelligence artificielle et découvertes scientifiques : contribuer aux forces du Canada
Organizer: Friends of CIHR
Panel Organizer: FCIHR Forum of 2017 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research Program | Organizer: Friends of CIHR

Keynote Address

“Canada’s Lead in AI Research:  Lessons for Discovery and Innovation"

Dr. Alan Bernstein, O.C., PhD, FRSC
President, CIFAR, and 2017 Friesen Prizewinner

Honorary Chair:

The Honourable Dr. Reza Moridi, PhD
Minister of Research, Innovation and Science, Government of Ontario

Co-Chairs: Mr. Andre Picard and Dr. Eric Meslin.
Welcome remarks: Dr. Aubie Angel 

Panelists:

Dr. Brenda Andrews
Dr. Doina Precup
Dr. Rémi Quirion
Dr. Linda Rabeneck
Dr. Peter Zandstra

Discussants:

Dr. Henry G. Friesen
Dr. Roderick R. McInnes
Dr. Duncan Stewart
Dr. Vivek Goel


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Brenda Andrews

Dr. Brenda Andrews

University Professor and Director of the Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto
avatar for Dr. Aubie Angel

Dr. Aubie Angel

President, Friends of CIHR
avatar for Dr. Alan Bernstein

Dr. Alan Bernstein

President and Chief Executive Officer, CIFAR
Alan Bernstein is CIFAR’s President and Chief Executive Officer of CIFAR since May 2012. | | Most recently, Dr. Alan Bernstein was executive director of the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise in New York. From 2000 to 2007, he served as the inaugural president of the Canadian Institutes... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Henry Friesen

Dr. Henry Friesen

Professor Emeritus, University of Manitoba
A renowned and visionary medical scientist, Dr. Henry Friesen is a Canadian endocrinologist credited with the discovery of human prolactin, and for redefining medical research in Canada. Now a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the University of Manitoba, Dr. Friesen was a Professor... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Vivek Goel

Dr. Vivek Goel

Vice President, Research and Innovation, University of Toronto
Professor Vivek Goel was appointed Vice President, Research and Innovation of the University of Toronto in December, 2014. Professor Goel is a distinguished scholar with an extensive background in teaching, research and university administration. He obtained his medical degree from... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Roderick McInnes

Dr. Roderick McInnes

Director, Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital
Roderick R. McInnes, CM OOnt MD PhD is the Director of the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, Alva Chair in Human Genetics, Canada Research Chair in Neurogenetics, and Professor of Human Genetics and of Biochemistry at McGill University. Until 2009, he was a University... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Eric M. Meslin

Dr. Eric M. Meslin

President/CEO, Council of Canadian Academies
Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS, is President and CEO of the Council of Canadian Academies. He joined the Council in February, 2016, bringing with him more than 25 years of experience in science policy in both university and government settings. Dr. Meslin came to the Council from... Read More →
avatar for Honourable Reza Moridi

Honourable Reza Moridi

Ontario Minister of Research, Innovation and Science
avatar for Andre Picard

Andre Picard

Health Columnist, The Globe and Mail
André Picard is the health columnist for The Globe and Mail, and the author of four bestselling books, most recently “Matters of Life and Death: Public Health Issues in Canada.” He is a graduate of the University of Ottawa and Carleton University and has been awarded six honorary... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Doina Precup

Dr. Doina Precup

Associate Dean, Research, Faculty of Science, McGill University
Doina Precup serves as Associate Dean (Research) in the Faculty of Science at McGill University, where she also co-directs the Reasoning and Learning Lab in the School of Computer Science; she is affiliated with the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA). She also currently... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rémi Quirion

Dr. Rémi Quirion

Chief Scientist of Quebec
Dr. Rémi Quirion, OC, PhD, CQ, FRSC is Québec’s first chief scientist. He chairs the boards of directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec and advises the Minister of Education, Higher Education and Research on research and scientific development issues. Until his appointment... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Linda Rabeneck

Dr. Linda Rabeneck

President, Canadian Academy of Health Sciences
President, Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Vice President, Prevention and Cancer Control at Cancer Care Ontario | Dr. Linda Rabeneck, a gastroenterologist, clinician scientist and health care executive, is Vice President, Prevention and Cancer Control at Cancer Care Ontario... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Duncan J Stewart

Dr. Duncan J Stewart

CEO and Scientific Director, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Dr. Duncan Stewart is a pioneering Canadian cardiovascular researcher, recognized for his many important discoveries in blood vessel biology, as well as his dedication to translating these discoveries into benefits for patients and society. After beginning his career in academic cardiology... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Peter Zandstra

Dr. Peter Zandstra

Director and UBC Professor, Michael Smith Laboratories and the School of Biomedical Engineering, UBC and U of T


Wednesday November 1, 2017 13:00 - 14:45
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

14:45

Coffee Break/ Pause-café
Wednesday November 1, 2017 14:45 - 15:00
GATINEAU 206/208

15:00

106 – Riding The Wave – Energy and Environment/ Portés par la vague – Énergie et environnement
Panel Organizer: Rabiz Foda, Terre Policy Center, India
Panel Organizer: Rabiz Foda, Terre Policy Center, India

Science and technology are key enablers of economic development. Natural resources are the core of Canadian economic competitiveness. Traditionally, energy is derived from natural resources. The tsunami of extraction of carbon from earth and its explosive addition to the environment for ‘mass production’, has led to deteriorating global climatic conditions.
To address the nexus between energy, water, health and food, and a transition from resource based to knowledge driven economy, a scientific evolution in energy and disruptive innovations in technology are needed for sustainable development. “There will come a day, far off but inevitable at some point, when traditional energy sources will no longer be needed. In preparing for that day, we have two critical responsibilities. One is to sustain the planet between now and then, so that we can pass this treasure on to our children – better than we found it. The second is to get ahead of the curve on innovation”. Prime Minister Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, at CERAWeek March 9, 2017, USA.
August 2016 was reported to be the 16th consecutive month of record-breaking heat. In the words of World Bank President, “…it would take more than $1 trillion a year over the next 15 years for countries to get their climate agenda on track. This may be viewed as a trillion-dollar opportunity for the private sector to help cut greenhouse gas emissions and create climate-smart investments on the ground. This could be an opportunity to take a potential disaster and turn it into one of the greatest win-win situations: Investments in clean energy driving economic growth”.
In this session, speakers will discuss their vision and strategic directions, policy and planning initiatives for disruptive innovations and transformative challenges for Canada. Analyze trends and ability of Canadian science and technology to harness the power of collaboration in a global leadership role for ‘enabling our future with sustainable energy’ – a golden thread that connects rapid economic growth, increased social equity, and an environment that promotes global development and prosperity.
Some points for discussion are:
  1. Enabling Canada’s Science and technology, R&D with emerging economies.
  2. Climate action from scientific evolution to technological revolution.
  3. Reorienting scientific temperament towards social innovations, technological entrepreneurship, policies and green growth to contribute to United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
  4. Innovative approaches in areas of Smart Campus, energy efficiency,
  5. Adoption of new partnerships including knowledge and technology transfer.

Moderators
avatar for Rabiz N. Foda

Rabiz N. Foda

Electric Utility Management Professional, Terre Policy Center, India
Rabiz N. Foda, P.Eng. FEC, is a Professional Engineer and Fellow of Engineers Canada, has extensive international experience in the energy space with utilities infrastructure development, engineering and project management for national and regional transmission and distribution systems... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Peter Mascher

Peter Mascher

Vice-Provost of International Affairs, Professor and William Sinclair Chair in Optoelectronics, McMaster University
Peter Mascher obtained a PhD in Engineering Physics in 1984 from the Graz University of Technology (TUG) in Austria and joined McMaster University in 1989. He is a professional engineer and a professor in the Department of Engineering Physics, and chaired the department from 1994... Read More →
avatar for Allison Sekuler

Allison Sekuler

Vice-President, Research and the Sandra A. Rotman Chair, Baycrest Health Sciences
Dr. Allison Sekuler is Vice-President, Research, and the Sandra A. Rotman Chair at Baycrest Health Sciences, fully affiliated with the University of Toronto and a global leader in geriatric residential living, healthcare, research, innovation and education, with a special focus on... Read More →
avatar for Rajendra M. Shende

Rajendra M. Shende

Chairman, TERRE Policy Centre, India
Rajendra M. Shende, former Director at United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in Paris for 20 years. Currently he is Chairman of TERRE Policy Centre in India, a not-for-profit think-tank and action-forum. He serves on Advisory Council to Board of Directors of IIM (Indian Institute... Read More →
avatar for Irene Sterian

Irene Sterian

President and CEO, ReMAP
Irene Sterian is the Executive Director and architect of a $19M Business-led Network of Centres of Excellence (BL-NCE) for renewable energy, new materials and optics & photonics. Driven by her passion for innovation, Irene is a master collaborator. Together with dozens of start-ups... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:00

201 – Teaching Kids to Code: Implications for Canada's Science Ecosystem/ Enseigner aux enfants comment codifier : conséquences pour l’écosystème des sciences au Canada
Panel Organizer: Tracey Ross, Actua
Panel Organizer: Tracy Ross, Actua

In Budget 2017, the Federal government announced a new fund specifically designed to support the engagement of youth in digital literacy and coding skills, signalling a political recognition of the critical importance of these skills to Canada's innovation capacity.  What does this new program and policy mean for Canada's capacity to produce scientific knowledge? What are today's initiatives and what are the expected results? What are the challenges? Join speakers from leading organizations who are ramping up efforts to engage Canadians from all backgrounds in building digital literacy.

Moderators
avatar for Marlene Floyd

Marlene Floyd

National Director, Corporate Affairs, Microsoft
Marlene Floyd is National Director, Corporate Affairs at Microsoft Canada. She is a seasoned and charismatic strategic communications and government relations expert with more than 15 years experience defining and designing national outreach and communication strategies for government... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Brian Aspinall

Brian Aspinall

Teacher, Speaker Coder, Maker
Brian Aspinall is highly respected and considered one of the brightest STEM innovators in Canadian education. He was awarded the Prime Minister’s Award for Teaching Excellence for his work with coding and computational thinking and has just completed his Master's Degree in Math... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Flanagan

Jennifer Flanagan

Co-Founder, President and CEO, Actua
Jennifer Flanagan is the co-founder and President and CEO of Actua, a national charitable organization that engages Canadian youth in inspiring and innovative science and technology experiences. Through camps, classroom workshops, clubs, and community outreach, Actua's programs reach... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Sariffodeen

Melissa Sariffodeen

Co-founder, Ladies Learning Code
Melissa is a social entrepreneur, leader and big thinker. As Co-Founder and CEO of Ladies Learning Code and Canada Learning Code, Melissa has established a reputation as a fierce advocate for women and youth. She is dedicated to ensuring that they have the critical skills, confidence, and opportunities that they need to become passionate builders -- not just consumers -- of technology and to thrive in our increasingly digital world... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:00

301 – Moving from lab to market: models of knowledge translation in Canada/ Du laboratoire au marché : modèles de transfert de connaissances au Canada
Panel Organizer: Sean Lee, TRIUMF
Panel Organizer: Sean Lee, TRIUMF

Moving innovation from the laboratory to the market is not only critical to maintaining Canada’s position as a global scientific leader, but it’s fundamental to our long-term growth and prosperity. This reality is widely recognized across the national science, technology, and innovation landscape, and there are a number of organizations – each with a unique focus and operating model – enjoying successes in this area.
This panel will bring together the leaders of a number of high profile incubator and accelerators from across Canada, representing sectors as diverse as information communication technology, health sciences, and physics. Profiling five case studies, the panel will demonstrate that there is no one-size-fits-all solution for innovation, but rather a mosaic of models, which together can get Canada to where it needs to be vis-à-vis growing global competition.

Moderators
avatar for Karimah Es Sabar

Karimah Es Sabar

CEO and Partner, Quark Venture Inc.
In her role as CEO & Partner at Quark Venture Ms. Es Sabar is also a Director of the Global Health Sciences Fund (GHS Fund), which was co-established with GF Securities Hong Kong and is one of the largest health sciences venture funds. | | Prior to joining Quark Venture, Ms. Es... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Hayashi

Kathryn Hayashi

President & CEO, TRIUMF Innovations Inc.
Prior to TRIUMF Innovations, Ms. Hayashi was the Founding Chief Financial Officer of The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD) and CDRD Ventures Inc, Canada’s national drug development and commercialization engine. As part of the founding team that started CDRD in 2007... Read More →
avatar for Gordon C. McCauley

Gordon C. McCauley

President & CEO, The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD)
Gordon McCauley was appointed President and CEO of The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD) in 2017 after serving on the Board for four years. Mr. McCauley is an accomplished life science investor and executive. | | He has served as President & CEO of Viable Healthworks... Read More →
avatar for Parimal Nathwani

Parimal Nathwani

Vice-President, Life Sciences, MaRS Innovation
Parimal Nathwani has over 15 years of experience in various aspects of the biotechnology industry, including corporate finance, business development, transactions, intellectual property management, technology development and operations. He has been actively involved in forming and... Read More →
avatar for Laura O'Blenis

Laura O'Blenis

Co-Founder and Managing Director, Canadian Association of University Research Parks (AURP)
Laura is the Co-Founder and Managing Director of the Canadian Association of University Research Parks (AURP). As part of work with AURP, Laura spearheaded federal government negotiations for access to national funding by the 26 research and technology parks in Canada, negotiated... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Yu

Rebecca Yu

Vice President, Market Access & External Affairs, Takeda Canada
Rebecca Yu is the Vice President, Market Access & External Affairs at Takeda Canada. Prior to assuming this role, she held the position of Head, JLABS Canada and was instrumental in setting up J&J Innovation’s first JLABS incubator outside the United States.  She was previously... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
ROOM 211 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:00

306-311(Merged Panel) – How to create dynamic agri-food regulatory policy in an era of accelerating technological innovation?/ Comment créer une politique réglementaire dynamique en matière d’agroalimentaire en période d’innovation technologique accéléré?
Panel Organizers: Ihor Boszko, Ontario Genomics and Mario Thomas, University of Guelph

Across the globe, innovations are transforming the economy and society, and creating change at an unprecedented and unpredictable pace. The potential for innovations in food systems is huge. The promise is no less than more nutritious, safer food produced at a lower cost, with fewer inputs and with less environmental impact. Emerging technologies arising out the digital revolution and the field of genomics and synthetic biology, such as CRISPR gene editing, are rapidly changing the global agriculture industry. This promise is set against a backdrop of a growing skepticism with current political and economic structures. Divergent responses by governments across jurisdictions, and the pace of policy development and regulatory responses that do not keep up with the speed of technological changes, add to the uncertainties and may further hamper the successful adoption of innovations. Innovators may be reticent to invest in new products because they have difficulty anticipating the commercial regulatory path. At the same time, regulators want to understand what products innovators are working on to be proactive about regulation. This panel brings together diverse representatives from industry, government and academia to share their expert perspectives on the dynamic relationship between regulation and innovation, and how to better design science policy to bring new and existing scientific knowledge to bear on Canadian challenges and opportunities in agri-food. Policies that power innovation in agri-food systems will grow Canada’s competitiveness.

Moderators
avatar for Malcolm M. Campbell

Malcolm M. Campbell

Vice-President (Research), University of Guelph
Dr. Malcolm Campbell, PhD. is Vice-President (Research) at the University of Guelph. He studied genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Guelph and University of British Columbia. Following post-doctoral work in Toulouse, France and Raleigh, North Carolina... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Pierre Bilodeau

Dr. Pierre Bilodeau

Executive Director, Science Branch Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Pierre Bilodeau provides leadership in plant health science at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to protect Canada's plant resource base. His directorate provides a valued source of scientific knowledge, analysis, risk assessment, and advice for government, industry, academia... Read More →
avatar for Evan Fraser

Evan Fraser

Director, Arrell Food Institute, University of Guelph
Evan Fraser, Director of the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph, started thinking about agriculture and food systems while spending summers working on his grandfather’s fruit farm in Niagara. Today, he holds the Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Global Food Security... Read More →
avatar for Cornelia Kreplin

Cornelia Kreplin

Executive Director, Bio Sector, Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions
As an integral component of Alberta’s innovation system, Alberta Innovates offers the opportunity to accelerate development of new knowledge and products that can be significant to Alberta. As an Executive Director at Alberta Innovates, Dr. Cornelia Kreplin is engaged in activities... Read More →
avatar for Michael M. Lohuis

Michael M. Lohuis

Vice-President, Research & Development, Semex Alliance
Michael M. Lohuis, Ph.D is Vice-President, Research & Development for Semex Alliance (Guelph, Ontario, Canada), which is a global dairy and beef breeding cooperative rapidly growing sales of genetic products and services worldwide. Semex actively utilizes genetic, genomic and reproductive... Read More →
avatar for Crystal Mackay

Crystal Mackay

President, Canadian Centre for Food Integrity
Crystal is the President of the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity, with a vision for building public trust in food and farming in Canada.  The Canadian Centre for Food Integrity represents a coalition of farmers and associated food and agri-businesses proactively working together... Read More →
avatar for Tyler Whale

Tyler Whale

President, Ontario Agri-Food Technologies
Tyler was raised on a seventh generation dairy farm in Wellington County.  After completing his Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry at McMaster University in 1999, he went on to obtain a PhD in microbiology/immunology from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization at the University... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:00

307 – Contested Decisions: The role of boundary organizations/ Décisions contestées : le rôle des organisations-frontières
Panel Organizer: Marc Saner, Institute for Science, Society and Policy, University of Ottawa
Panel Organizer: Marc SanerInstitute for Science, Society and Policy, University of Ottawa

It has been argued that we not only live in a "post-truth" environment, but also in a "post-normal science" world.   Post-normal science is characterized by both high system uncertainty and high stakes.  In this situation, achieving evidence-based decisions is often elusive because political values become dominant.  The question arises of how to manage the "science/policy interface" within this challenging environment.  Boundary organizations such as university institutes and think-tanks claim to be particularly relevant in this context.  Can they possibly deliver in a world characterized by high complexity and low trust?  And if yes, how?

Moderators
avatar for Sonia L’Heureux

Sonia L’Heureux

Parliamentary Librarian, Library of Parliament
Sonia L’Heureux was appointed Parliamentary Librarian on June 21, 2012. As Parliamentary Librarian, she oversees the management of the Library and reports to the Speakers of the Senate and the House of Commons who are responsible for directing and controlling the Library of Parliament... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Frédéric Bouchard

Frédéric Bouchard

President, ACFAS (Association francophone pour le savoir)
Élu pour un mandat de deux ans, le président de l’Acfas est Frédéric Bouchard. Titulaire d’un doctorat en philosophie de Duke University, il s’intéresse principalement aux fondements théoriques de la biologie évolutionnaire et de l’écologie ainsi qu’au rapport entre... Read More →
avatar for Karen Dodds

Karen Dodds

Former Assistant Deputy Minister, Environment and Climate Change Canada
Dr. Karen Dodds was the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Science and Technology Branch at Environment Canada from 2011 to 2016. In this position, she oversaw a large branch with activities, labs and scientists across Canada. From risk assessments of specific chemicals, to Canada's... Read More →
avatar for Johannes Klumpers

Johannes Klumpers

Head of Unit, Scientific Advice Mechanism, European Commission
Head of Scientific Advice Mechanism Unit, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission Johannes Klumpers heads the recently created Scientific Advice Mechanism Unit (SAM) of the European Commission. The unit provides the secretariats for the Commission’s High Level Group of Scientific... Read More →
avatar for Marc Saner

Marc Saner

Professor, University of Ottawa
Marc Saner is a Professor at the University of Ottawa, Canada (Geography, cross-appointed at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and the Institute for Science, Society and Policy). His interests are the science/policy interface, the governance of emerging technologies... Read More →


Wednesday November 1, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

16:30

Reception/ Réception
Wednesday November 1, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
RIDEAU CANAL ATRIUM Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

17:30

Evening of Celebration and Inspiration, Celebrating 150 Years of Canadian Science Achievement, Please click here for the agenda/ Célébration de 150 années de réalisations canadiennes en matière de sciences et d’innovation
Dress Code: Business Attire

The tentative agenda is as follows:
5:30 PM Welcome, Introductory Agenda of the Evening, and National Anthem
5:40 PM CSPC Remarks, Mehrdad Hariri, CSPC President & CEO
5:50 PM Introduction of the Governor General by Dr. Remi Quirion, Quebec Chief Scientist
6:00 PM Governor General Address
6:40 PM CSPC Science Policy Award of Excellence, Presented by Minister Kirsty Duncan
6:55 PM Introduction of Dr. Neil Turok by Dr. Art McDonald
7:05 PM "We are Innovators" Keynote by Dr. Neil Turok
8:05 PM Adjournment Coffee and Dessert

Abstract for Keynote Speech by Dr. Neil Turok, Director, Perimeter Institute, 'We Are Innovators'

This multimedia journey shares personal reflections on innovation and Canada's prospects - drawing insights from experiences at the cutting edge of science, technology, and social change. From seeing his parents jailed for resisting apartheid in South Africa, to study the Big Bang with Stephen Hawking, to working for the advancement of quantum science and technology in Canada, Neil presents a lively account of what innovation is and what it means for us all. He also explains why we must embrace the “four Cs” of innovation to build a brighter future for our country in a complex and challenging world. 

Speakers
avatar for Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette

Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette

C.C., C.M.M., C.O.M., C.Q., C.D., Governor General and Commander-in-Chief, Canada
Her Excellency, the Right Honourable Julie Payette is the 29th Governor General of Canada.  She is also known for being an astronaut, engineer, scientific broadcaster and corporate director. From 1992 to 2013, Ms. Payette worked as an astronaut and flew two missions in space. She also served many years as CAPCOM (Capsule Communicator) at NASA’s Mission Control Cen... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Neil Turok

Dr. Neil Turok

Director, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics


Wednesday November 1, 2017 17:30 - 20:30
TRILLIUM BALLROOM Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2
 
Thursday, November 2
 

07:45

BOOK LAUNCH/ LANCEMENT DE LIVRE: A Lantern on the Bow: A History of the Science Council of Canada and its Contributions to the Science and Innovation Policy Debate
PRESENTERS:
Jeff Kinder and Paul Dufour, co-editors
Janet Halliwell and Michael Jenkin, contributing authors

In a "post-truth” world, the need has never been greater for decision makers thirsty for the insights of science, technology and innovation policy to help chart and navigate our common future. As Canada rethinks its science advisory system, there is value in learning from past experiments. This session will engage participants in the history of the Science Council of Canada, an important institution at the intersection of science and governance that operated for a quarter-century between 1966 and 1992. Join co-editors Jeff Kinder and Paul Dufour who will provide an overview of the project and discuss the forthcoming book. They will be joined by contributing authors Janet Halliwell and Michael Jenkin to offer their reflections on the SCC's enduring relevance to the science and innovation policy debate in Canada. 

Speakers
avatar for Paul Dufour

Paul Dufour

Co-chair, Science Integrity Project
Paul Dufour was educated in science policy and history of science and technology at McGill, Concordia and Université de Montréal. He is adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy and Principal of PaulicyWorks, a science and technology... Read More →
avatar for Janet Halliwell

Janet Halliwell

Principal, JE Halliwell Associates Inc.
Janet Halliwell is the Principal of JE Halliwell Associates Inc., a company offering value-added services in policy and management consultancy relating to post-secondary education and science and technology, particularly publicly-funded R&D.  Janet has extensive experience in S&T... Read More →
avatar for Michael Jenkin

Michael Jenkin

Retired Senior Public Servant/ Former Director General, Consumer Affairs, Industry Canada
Michael Jenkin is a former federal public servant who has been involved in the area of policy development and management for most of his career.  He worked on technology and industrial development and consumer protection issues as a Director and Director General in Industry Canada... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Kinder

Jeff Kinder

Director, Innovation Lab, Institute on Governance
Jeff has almost 30 years of experience in government science and innovation policy in the US and Canada. His US experience includes the National Science Foundation, the National Academies and the Naval Research Laboratory.  In Canada, Jeff has worked at Industry Canada, Natural... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 07:45 - 08:25
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

08:30

Celebrity Chefs: What ingredients make an effective supercluster?/ Chefs étoiles : Quels ingrédients sont à la base de supergrappes efficaces?
This panel presents an opportunity for those engaged in the Supercluster process – to informally discuss:
  • The key ingredients of an effective “Supercluster”
  • The benefits they see emerging from the initiative, and
  • How Superclusters may facilitate more federal and academic R&D being linked to private sector innovation

Moderators
avatar for Dave Watters

Dave Watters

President/CEO, Global Advantage Consulting Group Inc
David Watters worked for 30 years in the Canadian Public Service in a variety of Economic Ministries,including a dozen years as an Assistant Deputy Minister in Industry Canada, Treasury Board Canada andFinance Canada, where he was responsible for overseeing federal Economic Development... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Vivek Goel

Dr. Vivek Goel

Vice President, Research and Innovation, University of Toronto
Professor Vivek Goel was appointed Vice President, Research and Innovation of the University of Toronto in December, 2014. Professor Goel is a distinguished scholar with an extensive background in teaching, research and university administration. He obtained his medical degree from... Read More →
avatar for John Knubley

John Knubley

Deputy Minister, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED)
John Knubley became Deputy Minister of Industry in September 2012. His previous position, beginning July 2009, was Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. In 2008, John served as Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs at the Privy Council Office. Prior to this, he... Read More →
avatar for Marc LePage

Marc LePage

President and CEO, Genome Canada
Marc LePage is President and CEO of Genome Canada.  Before assuming this role in January 2016, he served as President and CEO of Génome Québec since December 2011, where he led a major increase in research activity and enhanced focus on the development of genomic applications... Read More →
avatar for Avvey Peters

Avvey Peters

Vice President, Partnerships, Communitech
Avvey Peters is Vice President, Partnerships with Communitech. She focuses on strategic communications, advocacy, and partnership development to advance the Waterloo Region tech sector. Avvey is also cross appointed as Managing Director of the Canadian Digital Media Network – a... Read More →
avatar for Joy Romero

Joy Romero

Vice President, Technology & Innovation, Canadian Natural Resources Limited
Joy has worked in steel, iron ore, coal and oil and gas. She has served as Chair of the Governing Council of Athabasca University, advisor to the NSERC chair for Oil Sands, University of Alberta, the NSERC Chair for Energy and Imaging, University of Calgary, chair of the Canadian... Read More →
avatar for Iain Stewart

Iain Stewart

President, National Research Council Canada
Iain Stewart was appointed President of the National Research Council (NRC) effective August 24, 2016. | | Prior to that, Mr. Stewart served as Associate Secretary of the Treasury Board of Canada from July 2015 to August 2016, and Assistant Secretary of the International Affairs... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 08:30 - 10:00
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:00

Coffee Break/ Pause-café
Thursday November 2, 2017 10:00 - 10:30
GATINEAU 206/208

10:30

107 – Canada's Clinical Innovation in Fifty Years: The Future May Be Rare/ L’innovation clinique du Canada dans cinquante ans : Les possibilités d’avenir peuvent être rares
Panel Organizer: Angela Behboodi, Hoffmann-La Roche Limited
Panel Organizer: Angela Behboodi, Hoffmann-La Roche Limited

Canada has long been a strong contributor to the world’s advances in clinical research and health innovation. Harnessing many unique assets that span demographic diversity, to academic leadership, clinical expertise, government commitment and public-private collaboration; sustaining Canada’s role as a medical research and health innovation hub is paramount and particularly apparent when examining support for rare disease. As the rate of scientific advancement accelerates, public policy, clinical practice, and health-system adoption have not kept pace and the need for adaptive policy, novel implementation and infrastructure accommodation widens. This gap is only amplified when you consider the “extraordinary” needs of people living with a rare disorder. However, there are areas where great strides have been made and solutions to address these shared challenges have been realized, both here in Canada and across the globe. This panel will surface challenges, opportunities and emerging best practices in enabling a sustained, vibrant Canadian science and health innovation environment for orphan and common diseases.
 
The panel “Canada’s Clinical Innovation in Fifty Years: The Future May Be Rare” focuses on the future of clinical innovation as a means to cultivate supportive conditions for improved care for rare patients in Canada. The use of scientific knowledge to improve patient impact and system receptivity is at the core of this topic.  More importantly, it raises numerous interesting and difficult policy questions related to how Canada must ready the system to address the “extraordinary” needs of rare patients including; novel clinical innovation strategies, new regulatory and funding mechanisms, infrastructure accommodation and knowledge sharing across boundaries and through centres of excellence.  


Moderators
avatar for Dr. Lawrence Korngut

Dr. Lawrence Korngut

Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary
Dr. Korngut is a neurologist and clinical neurophysiologist at the Calgary Neuromuscular Clinic and is the Director of the Calgary ALS and Motor Neuron Disease Clinic. His research includes phase II and III clinical trials of new therapies for neuromuscular conditions. He is the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Kym Boycott

Dr. Kym Boycott

Leader, Care4Rare Canada and Rare Diseases Models and Mechanisms networks
Kym Boycott is a Medical Geneticist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Senior Scientist at the CHEO Research Institute, and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa. Dr. Boycott’s research program in rare diseases bridges clinical medicine to basic... Read More →
avatar for Susan Marlin

Susan Marlin

CEO, Clinical Trials Ontario
As the CEO of Clinical Trials Ontario, Susan Marlin is dedicated to ensuring a robust environment remains for scientific discovery in Ontario and Canada. She has been actively engaged in research ethics for many years and serves on many Boards supporting clinical research including... Read More →
avatar for Dr. William McKellin

Dr. William McKellin

Medical Anthropologist, University of British Columbia
Dr. William McKellin, brings a unique perspective to the panel as a father of a child living with a rare disorder, a founding Board Member of the Rare Disease Foundation of Canada and a Medical Anthropologist at UBC who studies “translational research” and “functional endpoints... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Durhane Wong-Rieger

Dr. Durhane Wong-Rieger

CEO, Canadian Organization for Rare Disorders
Dr. Durhane Wong-Rieger, PhD., the CEO of Canadian Organization for Rare Disorders is acknowledged both in Canada and globally for advancing the agenda on rare disease and spurring public discourse on the merits of clinical research. She is leading the charge on implementation of... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 211 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

202 – Indigenous & Western Science: Gathering new knowledge through co-designed research/ Savoir autochtone et science occidentale : acquérir de nouvelles connaissances par l’entremise de la recherche co-conceptualisée | Organizer: Jennifer Sokol
Panel Organizer: Jennifer Sokol, Polar Knowledge Canada

The planet is experiencing exponential change, and the Arctic is warming at an accelerated pace, resulting in many environmental, social and economic implications.  Western science cannot answer all the questions and is only part of the solution.  Indigenous people have been surviving in the Arctic for centuries; they have made observations, tracked animals, lived across the North and are connected to the land and water.  This session will address the challenges involved when gathering scientific knowledge from the Canadian Arctic, and the need to gather knowledge in a way that builds on and respects our past, while using the latest technology and anticipating the scientific needs of future. The panel will discuss how the coproduction of knowledge, where western science and Indigenous knowledge is collected together and used as equal ways of knowing, results in an innovative new type of knowledge. This knowledge would not be produced without the collective interaction of both knowledge systems at the same time. As Canada celebrates its 150 anniversary, what better time to recognize Canada’s first peoples, the value of Indigenous and traditional/local knowledge, and the need to equally integrate all ways of knowing as we journey into the next 150 years.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. David J. Scott

Dr. David J. Scott

President and CEO, Polar Knowledge Canada
Dr. David J. Scott is the President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR). He joined the organization as Executive Director of the former Canadian Polar Commission in March 2012, and co-led the recent merger of the Canadian Polar Commission with the Canadian... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Sébastien Moore

Jean-Sébastien Moore

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Université Laval
Jean-Sébastien Moore is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and the Institute of Integrative and Systems Biology at Université Laval in Québec City. He holds a B.Sc. (Hons) and a M.Sc. from McGill University, a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia, and... Read More →
avatar for Marie-Eve Neron

Marie-Eve Neron

Director of Climate Change and Clean Energy, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Marie-Eve has been the Director of Climate Change and Clean Energy since 2015. She has worked with INAC for more than 14 years, starting in the INAC Atlantic regional office as an environmental officer. She then moved to the national office to work as a policy analyst on climate change... Read More →
avatar for Angela Nuliayok Rudolph

Angela Nuliayok Rudolph

Master's Student, Arctic and Northern Studies program, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Angela is an Inuk from Gjoa Haven, Nunavut. She is currently in the process of completing her Master's thesis with the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the Arctic and Northern Studies program. Her research focuses on understanding whether Inuit men and women respond to the impacts... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

325 – Scientists as conveners and ambassadors for facts? Evidence co-creation for a hyper-complex post-fact politics/ Les scientifiques comme facilitateurs et ambassadeurs des faits? Co-création de la preuve pour une politique post-factuelle hypercomplexe
Panel Organizer: Milena Raykovska, European Commission, Joint Research Centre

A world of a super-abundance of knowledge from sources of variable quality, where complexity has increased exponentially, trust in authorities has diminished and "post-fact" politics appears to be on the rise, creates new challenges for policymakers and scientists who strive towards evidence-informed policies.
The new profession of science advisors requires scientist to be deeply familiar with knowledge at the intersection of policy, democracy and science. To have a policy impact, science advisors need to have the “ability to provide scientific advice in support of policy decisions…effectively addressing the limits of science, the insufficiency of evidence, and appropriately framing uncertainties.”
The session will explore the role of scientists wishing to influence policy in today's climate of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. The session will debate a number of questions, some of which brilliantly outlined by Naomi Oreskes (Harvard University), on the calling and responsibilities of scientists. Do facts speak for themselves? What should the role of scientist be? How to be an ambassador for facts and a convener? Should scientists speak only about problems or also about solutions? Doesn't it blur boundaries between science and policy, between facts and values?
Sensitising researchers of the necessity to participate in public and political debates and be ambassadors for their research results opens a whole field of questions, which could make scientists very uncomfortable. The session intends to address these and promulgate universal corner stones for developing and communicating science for policy based on responsibility, integrity, independence, and accountability. The linear model of evidence-informed policy-making has proven to be inefficient. There is an increasing need of ‘doing science differently’, notably through cocreation and co-production of ‘evidence’. To have greater policy impact, we need to move from arms-length, one-shot, silo'ed and slow delivery of knowledge to policy towards iterative, intimate, systems/joined-up approach and just-in-time delivery through co-creation in "epistemic communities".
The session will go a step further and explore which are the best new methodologies, tools (research synthesis, behavioural insights, citizen/society/stakeholder engagement, policy labs) and skill-sets (knowledge management and community facilitation, communication, visualisation) to fulfil this new role. How do scientists increase impact of science on policies? How to build a lasting relationship of trust, co-creation and co-production with the policymakers? How to establish a position of a convener? The session will draw conclusions on what are the training needs of the actors at the evidence for policy interface in order to be better conveners and ambassadors for facts.

Moderators
avatar for Monica Gattinger

Monica Gattinger

Director, Institute for Science, Society and Policy
Monica Gattinger is Director of the Institute for Science, Society and Policy and Associate Professor at the School of Political Studies. Her research and engagement focus on North American energy policy and Canadian arts and cultural policy. What links the two is her interest in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Graham

Kathryn Graham

Executive Director, Performance Management and Evaluation, Alberta Innovates
Kathryn is a co‐founder of the International School on Research Impact Assessment and was Director of the School when it was hosted in Banff in 2014. She is the Executive Director of Performance Management and Evaluation at Alberta Innovates, a Canadian‐based publicly‐funded... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Kerr

Jeremy Kerr

Professor of Biology, University Research Chair in Macroecology and Conservation, University of Ottawa
Jeremy Kerr is Professor of Biology and University Research Chair in Macroecology and Conservation at University of Ottawa. His research focuses on understanding how global changes affect conservation prospects for vital species, such as pollinators. He has published more than 80... Read More →
avatar for David Mair

David Mair

Head of Unit, responsible for Science advice to policy and the Work Programme, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (the Commission's science and knowledge service)
David has worked for the EU's European Commission since 1995 and in the Joint Research Centre (the Commission's science and knowledge service) since 2011 as Head of Unit responsible for Science advice to policy and the Work Programme. Since July 2016 he is Head of the Unit "Knowledge... Read More →
avatar for Bob Walker

Bob Walker

‎Retired Senior Executive/ Former President and CEO, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories
Dr. Robert Walker has had a distinguished career in public service in various leadership roles, both domestic and international. From November 2010 until his retirement in September 2015, Dr. Walker was with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, a federal Crown Corporation, first as Senior... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

502 – Does Canada have a Science Culture?/ Le Canada a-t-il une culture scientifique?
Panel Organizers: Kirsten Vanstone, RCIS and Dr. Reinhart Reithmeier, University of Toronto
Organizers: Kirsten Vanstone, Royal Canadian Institute for Science (RCIS) and Dr. Reinhart Reithmeier, Professor, University of Toronto

Canadians have ranked Banting and Best, two of the discoverers of insulin, high on their list of heroes. Popular Canadian writer, Alice Munro won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2013. But, how many know about the work of other Canadian Nobel Prize winners such as John Polanyi (1986), Michael Smith (1993), Bertram Brockhouse (1994), or Art McDonald (2015)? How many know of the discovery of stem cells in the 60s by Till and McCullough at the Ontario Cancer Institute and the enormous potential of this technology in regenerative medicine? In 2014, the Canadian Council of Academies issued a report entitled “Science culture in Canada: where do we stand?” The panel takes off from this report.


Moderators
avatar for Ivan Semeniuk

Ivan Semeniuk

Science Reporter, The Globe and Mail
Ivan’s career has touched many different means and media, starting at the Ontario Science Centre, then moving on to the Discovery Channel Canada, and as a senior correspondent with two of the highest-impact science publications in the world (Nature and New Scientist). He has been... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Chantal Barriault

Dr. Chantal Barriault

Director, Science Communication Graduate Program, Laurentian University and Science North
Dr. Barriault leads the only Science Communication Graduate Program of its kind in Canada, offered jointly by Laurentian University and Science North. She spent most of her early career working at Science North where she led many science communication projects. Now a master lecturer... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Maurice Bitran

Dr. Maurice Bitran

CEO, Ontario Science Centre
Prior to joining the Science Centre, Dr. Bitran held many positions in the Ontario Public Service including Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) of the Integrated Environmental Policy Division, Ministry of the Environment, ADM of Policy and Programs at the Ministry of Economic Development... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kelly Bronson

Dr. Kelly Bronson

Canada Research Chair candidate, University of Ottawa
Kelly Bronson is a social scientist studying science-society tensions that erupt around controversial technologies and their governance processes—from GMOs to big data. Her research aims to bring community values into conversation with technical knowledge in the production of evidence-based... Read More →
avatar for Marc LePage

Marc LePage

President and CEO, Genome Canada
Marc LePage is President and CEO of Genome Canada.  Before assuming this role in January 2016, he served as President and CEO of Génome Québec since December 2011, where he led a major increase in research activity and enhanced focus on the development of genomic applications... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

319 – Science Integrity: Jump-starting Public Science (45 minutes) / Intégrité scientifique : relancer la science publique (45 minutes) | Panel Organizer: Maxime Gingras, PIPSC & Evidence For Democracy (E4D)
Panel Organizer: Maxime Gingras, PIPSC & Evidence For Democracy (E4D)

Over 15,000 federal scientists represented by the Professional Institute of the Public Service (PIPSC) are tasked with protecting, among other things, the health and safety of Canadian food, water, transportation systems, buildings and consumer products. They also protect the environment and promote the vitality of our economy through innovations in science and technology. In 2016 PIPSC negotiated with Treasury Board the first-ever collective agreement provision for Scientific Integrity. The new provision includes guaranteeing the right of federal scientists to speak freely about science and their research. At the same time, PIPSC and the federal government agreed to co-develop Scientific Integrity agreements in science-based departments and agencies (SBDAs) staffed by 10 or more scientists.
As a result of the innovative new provision, science based departments must now develop and maintain Scientific Integrity policies that include the following Principles of Scientific Integrity:
  • Release of scientific information and data to the public in a timely manner and in keeping with Directive on Open Government
  • Attribution and acknowledgement of the contributions of Government of Canada science and scientists
  • Science is of high quality, free from political, commercial and client interference
  • Ensure the education of employees of the department / agency on the role of science in evidence based decision making.
  • Professional Development and the employee’s role in the development of government policy or advice.

These provisions will restore and maintain public confidence in public science. By CSPC 2017, the new Scientific Integrity policies will be in development by PIPSC scientists and the Federal SBDA’s. Alongside representatives from the Government and Evidence For Democracy (E4D), our panel will report to CSPC on the principles of Science Integrity and the collaborative journey of these “made in Canada” policies set to change the way Public Science operates. The panel will also discuss the road ahead for such innovative and unique science policies, how they will affect evidence-based decision making to address Canada’s challenges, and how they will contribute to the government’s Innovation Agenda.

Moderators
avatar for Maxime Gingras

Maxime Gingras

This will be Maxime's third time at CSPC on behalf of PIPSC. His work and research helped PIPSC, the Treasury Board Secretariat and federal scientists come to an agreement on the development of Science Integrity Policies within Science-based Federal Departments and Agencies. As an... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Paul Dufour

Paul Dufour

Co-chair, Science Integrity Project
Paul Dufour was educated in science policy and history of science and technology at McGill, Concordia and Université de Montréal. He is adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy and Principal of PaulicyWorks, a science and technology... Read More →
avatar for Katie Gibbs

Katie Gibbs

Co-Founder, Executive Director, Evidence for Democracy
Katie Gibbs is a scientist, organizer and advocate for science and evidence-based policies. While completing her PhD at the University of Ottawa researching threats to endangered species, she was one of the lead organizers of the ‘Death of Evidence’ rally - one of the largest... Read More →
avatar for Matthew MacLeod

Matthew MacLeod

RE Group President, Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada
Matthew R. MacLeod is a Defence Scientist working at DND and is a long-time supporter and innovator of Science Integrity. As RE Group president, Matthew was essential in elaborating and negotiating the Science Integrity agreement between PIPSC and Treasury Board. His knowledge and... Read More →
avatar for Michael Urminsky

Michael Urminsky

Research Team Lead, PIPSC IPFPC
Michael Urminsky led the work to negotiate the requirement for Federal Departments and Agencies to adopt scientific integrity policies on behalf of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada. He is a lawyer and researcher, who has held various positions throughout... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

503 – Bringing Soapbox Science to Canada: Shifting Gender Norms in Science (45 minutes) / Ramener Soapbox Science au Canada : normes changeantes en matière de genre, propres au secteur scientifique (45 minutes)
Panel Organizer: Leigh Paulseth

Panel Organizer: Leigh Paulseth, Ryerson University

The Fundamental Science Review (Naylor et. al., 2017) has highlighted the importance of embracing diversity in science to “draw on a larger base of talent”. It also points out that “the inclusion of diverse perspectives has the further advantage of broadening horizons and improving interpretation of information and decision-making alike.” The negative impact that a lack of diversity brings to science requires immediate action. Science and the public both hold antiquated gender stereotypes about scientists and therefore specific programming is required to challenge stereotypes and encourage gender diversity in science.

Soapbox Science, founded in the UK, is designed to counteract gender stereotypes and implicit gender bias in science by promoting and highlighting women scientists in academia. Soapbox Science uses public spaces to disseminate scientific knowledge for the general public while serving as an actionable way to advance equity and diversity in STEM. Its impact addresses two key priorities in scientific outreach and public engagement within Canada: 
1) Promoting the image of female scientists and their work
2) Publicly disseminating and promoting scientific research & literacy

In 2017, Soapbox Science was brought to North America for the first time. Held at one of the busiest intersections in Canada, the event highlighted female scientists from Windsor to Cape Breton and challenged public perceptions of science by placing leading women scientist of different ages, disciplines and ethnicities in public spaces, to talk about their research. Their work was accessible and inclusive and on the street, promoting a public image of science that is diverse, engaged, accessible and inclusive.

Inspiring the next generation of scientists necessitates the promotion of role models who reflect the young women and men in our communities. Diversity is a well-known driver of innovation which is essential if Canada is to remain competitive in the next 150 years. Young women and marginalized youth need to feel represented in our ranks if the best minds are going to be engaged in STEM.


Moderators
avatar for Dr. Imogen Coe

Dr. Imogen Coe

Professor; Dean, Faculty of Science, Ryerson University
Dr. Imogen Coe is the founding Dean of the Faculty of Science, Professor at Ryerson University, and an affiliate scientist in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Keenan Research Centre at St. Michael’s Hospital. In addition to being a research scientist and academic leader... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Emily Agard

Dr. Emily Agard

Director, SciXchange, Ryerson University
Emily Agard earned a B.Sc. (honours) in Life Sciences from Queen's University and a Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of Toronto.  She taught biology at York University and the University of Toronto at Scarborough before joining Ryerson as an Associate Professor.  Currently... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Stephanie MacQuarrie

Dr. Stephanie MacQuarrie

Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry, Cape Breton University
Stephanie MacQuarrie is an Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry at Cape Breton University and researches in the area of BioChar and Catalysis. Stephanie obtained her BSc from Mount Alison University in 2000 and her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Virginia Tech in 2005. She continued... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Nadia Octave

Dr. Nadia Octave

Medical Physicist at Centre-Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Université Laval
Dr. Nadia Octave is a medical physicist working at Centre-Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec – Université Laval in Québec City in the radio-oncology department. Medical physics encompasses all the applications of radiation in medicine. Her work specifically deals with treating... Read More →
avatar for Leigh Paulseth

Leigh Paulseth

Enrichment & Outreach Coordinator, Ryerson University
Leigh Paulseth is the Enrichment and Outreach Coordinator at SciXchange. She has a passion for communicating environmental and scientific issues to the public and loves to engage learners of all ages in actions and activities to better our understanding of this world. Leigh has a... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

12:00

Lunch/ Dîner
Thursday November 2, 2017 12:00 - 13:30
GATINEAU 206/208

12:30

Luncheon Session- A Conversation with Chief Science Advisor Dr. Mona Nemer
We are pleased to announce that Dr. Mona Nemer will join the 9th Canadian Science Policy Centre. Dr. Mona Nemer will deliver a speech, engage in an interview with ourPresident & CEO Mehrdad Hariri, and will answer audience questions.

Biography:

Before becoming Canada’s Chief Science Advisor, Dr. Mona Nemer was Professor andVice-President, Research, at the University of Ottawa and Director of the MolecularGenetics and Cardiac Regeneration Laboratory. 

Her research focused on the heart, particularly on the mechanisms of heart failure and congenital heart diseases. She is the author of over 200 highly cited publications that have appeared in prestigious scientific journals. Her work has contributed to the development of diagnostic tests for heart failure and the genetics of cardiac birth defects. She has trained over 100 students from various countries.

Dr. Nemer has served on several national and international advisory committees and executive boards and is the recipient of many national and international honours. Sheis a Member of the Order of Canada, a fellow of the Academy of Sciences of the RoyalSociety of Canada, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, a Knight of the Ordre national du Québec and a Knight of the French Republic’s order national duMérite. She has also been awarded honorary doctorates from France and Finland.

Dr. Nemer holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from McGill University. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, she was a Professor of Pharmacology at the Université deMontréal and directed the Cardiac Genetics Unit at the Montreal Clinical ResearchInstitute.

Thursday November 2, 2017 12:30 - 13:30
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

309 – Science Diplomacy – An International Comparison/ Diplomatie scientifique – Une comparaison internationale
Panel Organizer: Urs Obrist, Embassy of Switzerland
Panel Organizer: Urs Obrist, Embassy of Switzerland

Science Diplomacy has become an instrument of international collaboration both in the interest to connect scientists around the world as well as using science as a tool for diplomatic activity. The panel discussants will outline their respective countries’ focus, strategies and endeavours with regards to science diplomacy and diplomacy for science and discuss possibilities how to enhance collaboration with Canada through scientific channels.

The panel consists of speakers from Japan, France, Germany and Switzerland and provide distinct national science policies.

Moderators
avatar for Mehrdad Hariri

Mehrdad Hariri

Founder, CEO & President, Canadian Science Policy Centre

Speakers
avatar for Shiho Fujiwara

Shiho Fujiwara

First Secretary, Embassy of Japan in Canada
The presentation will outline Japanese Science and Technology Diplomacy Policy and describe the activities of a Japanese Science and Technology advisor. It will also include a discussion of the recently released document “Four Actions of Science and Technology Diplomacy to Implement... Read More →
avatar for Urs Obrist

Urs Obrist

Senior Science and Technology Counsellor, Embassy of Switzerland
Swiss Science Diplomacy and the network of the Swissnex science consulates Switzerland is a relatively small country. However, it plays a leading role on a global level when it comes to science and innovation. In this environment, science diplomacy is of high relevance for Switzerland’s... Read More →
avatar for Antoine Rauzy

Antoine Rauzy

Science and Higher Education Attaché, Embassy of France
Science is an international common good. As such, it is an object of the diplomacy. Scientific questions are part of increasingly important international issues today. We can cite a few examples such as the climate challenges, the debates around nuclear power, or the development of... Read More →
avatar for Marcus Stadthaus

Marcus Stadthaus

First Secretary, Science, Sustainable Development, Energy, Embassy of Germany
For Germany, international scientific relations are a core aspect of diplomacy. Science and scientists connect people and build bridges across different cultures and nations. Following standards set by science, scientists’ interaction creates trust and understanding and smoothens... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 211 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

314 – Science at Risk (45 minutes) / La science en danger (45 minutes)
Panel Organizer: Viviana Fernandez, Human Rights Research and Education Centre University of Ottawa
Panel Organizer: Viviana FernandezHuman Rights Research and Education Centre University of Ottawa

The importance of science and its contributions to informing public policy have been challenged in recent years. There has been an erosion of the “position of science” in policy debates and the replacement of evidence-based policies with populist ideologies on political platforms in developed and developing countries alike. From the firing of Turkish academics, to the U.S. travel bans which call into question the value placed on foreign scholars, students and researchers, to incidents of hate speech and structural racism affecting immigrants, members of the LGBTQ community, religious minorities, people with disabilities, women, etc., scientists are facing an increasing level of risk to conduct their work. These actions are dampening the international nature of science by effectively limiting the participation of a significant number of colleagues in different fields whose contributions risk being absent from scientific debates going forward. Faced with global challenges like food and energy security or climate change, the scientific community needs to make the case for the role of science in policy, reflecting science as a public good.

Since higher education is a global endeavour, there is an opportunity for Canadian institutions to recruit global talent and benefit from their expertise. To this end, are there strategic areas in which Canada should focus on to respond to our future challenges? How can we ensure that researchers and students can work to their full potential in Canada? What can Canada do to counter some of the most dangerous trends? What are the risks of not acting to ensure openness, transparency and the free-flow of ideas and people? 

Moderators
avatar for Viviana Fernandez

Viviana Fernandez

Assistant Director, Human Rights Research and Education Centre
Viviana Fernandez is the Assistant Director at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre, University of Ottawa. She represents the University of Ottawa in the Scholars at Risk (SAR) Network and was elected to the Steering Committee of the SAR Canada Section in 2016 and to the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fayyaz Baqir

Fayyaz Baqir

University of McGill
Fayyaz Baqir has just completed a stay as visiting scholar on Gender, State and Civil Society Relations at the Department of Cultural Sciences of the Gothenburg University, Sweden. During 2014/15, he taught and researched on human rights and informal justice at the School of European... Read More →
avatar for Philip Landon

Philip Landon

VP Governance and Programs, Universities Canada
Philip Landon is vice president, governance and programs at Universities Canada. He is responsible for the association’s corporate and governance framework and serves as secretary to the Board of Directors. He also leads the publications (including University Affairs), and programs... Read More →
avatar for Joyce Pisarello

Joyce Pisarello

Senior Program Officer, Membership and Outreach, Scholars at Risk
Joyce Pisarello is a Senior Program Officer for Membership and University Relations at Scholars at Risk.  Her work involves managing network relationships and connecting member institutions to SAR’s programming. Prior to joining SAR Joyce worked in public policy as a research associate... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

321 – Bridging the Divide: Incorporating up-to date research findings and social shifts into public policy (45 minutes) / Surmonter les différences – Allier les résultats de recherche courants et les changements sociaux à la politique publique
Panel Organizer: Sally Rutherford, Canadian Association for Graduate Studies 

The session is based on the opinion piece written by Dr. Martha Crago in University Affairs that addresses the need for academics to share knowledge and ideas with the general public and with policy makers. The panel would focus on the challenges—and importance—of incorporating up-to date research findings and social shifts into public policy. The diverse panel would address the issue from the points of view of the insularity of both the public service and the academy – and how this divide can be bridged.

Moderators
avatar for Brenda Brouwer

Brenda Brouwer

Vice Provost and Dean, School of Graduate Studies, Queen’s University
Professor, School of Rehabilitation Therapy and the Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen’s University | President, Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) Dr. Brouwer joined Queen’s in 1990 after completing her PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Toronto. She... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Bailey

David Bailey

President and CEO, Genome Alberta
Dr. Bailey obtained his Ph.D. in Genetics and Animal Breeding at the University of Alberta in 1985 and began his long and distinguished career with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada starting as a research scientist in Lethbridge, Alberta and was later appointed to management postings... Read More →
avatar for Ronald-Frans Melchers

Ronald-Frans Melchers

Professor of Criminology, University of Ottawa
Ron Melchers has been a professor of criminology at the University of Ottawa since 1983, specialised in research, statistics, evaluation, policy analysis and evidence reliability assessment. His research focuses on how information and perception shape criminal justice policy looking... Read More →
avatar for Eric Montpetit

Eric Montpetit

Professor, Political Science Department, Université de Montréal
I am a professor in the political science department at the Université de Montréal. I am current interim chair of the department. I completed a Ph.D. in comparative and Canadian public policy at McMaster University in 1999. My current research centres on the behavior of policy... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

506 – Big Thinking Panel, Expertise in a post-truth era: How to be a trusted advisor in a low-trust world/ expertise dans une période postfactuelle : comment être un conseiller fiable dans un monde où le niveau de confiance est faible
506 – Big Thinking Panel, Expertise in a post-truth era: How to be a trusted advisor in a low-trust world
506 – Groupe de discussion sur la capacité à voir grand, expertise dans une période postfactuelle : comment être un conseiller fiable dans un monde où le niveau de confiance est faible 

Panel Organizer: Peter Severinson, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The apparent rise in populist, anti-intellectual sentiment around the world presents serious risks to the research community, public-policy practitioners and, indeed, the functioning of a democratic society. Widespread popular rejection of evidence-backed messages in areas such as the environment, public health and national security is contributing to destructive policies and behaviours, including inaction on climate change, declining vaccination rates and hostility to immigration.Researchers, business leaders, public servants and other subject-matter experts now face difficult questions: To what extent have they lost public trust? Why do so many reject the findings of experts? What are the consequences of a political discourse that is dismissive of facts? And how can researchers, public servants and other experts build and maintain public trust in the years ahead? This panel will explore these questions by examining the nature of the “post-truth” phenomenon; the social forces that underlie it; and practical steps researchers and public-policy practitioners can take to grow public trust.

Moderators
avatar for Gabriel Miller

Gabriel Miller

Executive Director, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences
Gabriel Miller is an experienced not-for-profit leader who has built an extensive track record in member relations, advocacy, stakeholder engagement and public policy development over his 16-year career. Prior to joining the Federation, he served in a series of senior roles with... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Kimmel

Lisa Kimmel

President and CEO, Edelman Canada
Lisa Kimmel has been described by clients and colleagues alike as a smart, strategic thinker and a natural leader who empowers others to be and do their best. Her ability to rally a team to co-create exceptional programs and outcomes together is one of her great talents. Lisa’s... Read More →
avatar for Mark Kingwell

Mark Kingwell

Professor of Philosophy, University of Toronto
Mark Kingwell is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto and a contributing editor of Harper’s Magazine in New York. He is the author or co-author of eighteen books of political, cultural and aesthetic theory, including the national bestsellers Better Living (1998... Read More →
avatar for Rima Wilkes

Rima Wilkes

President, Canadian Sociological Association
Rima Wilkes is Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia and the President of the Canadian Sociological Association. Her current work - “It’s a Question of Trust: Explaining Ethno-Racial Differences in Trust” - is funded by a grant from the Social Sciences... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

322 – Leveraging Federal Science: How Provinces Can Make a Difference in Strengthening Canadian Knowledge Production/ Miser sur la science fédérale: comment les provinces peuvent contribuer au renforcement de la production de connaissances canadiennes
322 – Leveraging Federal Science: How Provinces Can Make a Difference in Strengthening Canadian Knowledge Production 
322 – Miser sur la science au palier fédéral : comment les provinces peuvent contribuer au renforcement de la production de connaissances canadiennes 

Panel Organizer: Anna Buczek, Council of Canadian Academies

In Canada, science is as much a provincial endeavor as it is a national one. Indeed, as the primary funders of universities, provinces are inextricably linked to Canada’s scientific effort. Yet, while both the provinces and federal government play critical roles in supporting science-performing institutions and infrastructure, Canada’s science ecosystem is both complex and remarkably uncoordinated.
Understanding the relationship between, and opportunities for, more explicit federal, provincial and territorial science policy may be a way to leverage federal science for the benefit of the country as a whole.  By bringing a degree of coordination to the Canadian science policy system, such policies would allow provincial governments to better align this essential resource with provincial priorities and provide a strategic framework for building critical mass for federal science investments to the benefit of not just the provinces but also Canadian science.
Few provincial governments, however, have ever been successful at developing or sustaining their own science policy.  With the release of the federal government’s review on fundamental science review in 2017, an important opportunity exists to have a serious conversation about the opportunities for both the provincial and federal governments to help strengthen Canadian research. 
This panel session will begin this important conversation using three questions:
  1. Should all provinces be encouraged to develop their own explicit science policies?
  2. What are the opportunities that would result from greater pan-Canadian multilevel coordination across the science system?
  3. What are the barriers to realizing these opportunities?

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Eric M. Meslin

Dr. Eric M. Meslin

President/CEO, Council of Canadian Academies
Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS, is President and CEO of the Council of Canadian Academies. He joined the Council in February, 2016, bringing with him more than 25 years of experience in science policy in both university and government settings. Dr. Meslin came to the Council from... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Krista Connell

Krista Connell

Chief Executive Officer, Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
As Chief Executive Officer at Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, Krista Connell has been instrumental in increasing the capacity and activity of Nova Scotia’s health research enterprise. | | She is recognized nationally and internationally as a champion of health research... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Kinder

Jeff Kinder

Director, Innovation Lab, Institute on Governance
Jeff has almost 30 years of experience in government science and innovation policy in the US and Canada. His US experience includes the National Science Foundation, the National Academies and the Naval Research Laboratory.  In Canada, Jeff has worked at Industry Canada, Natural... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rémi Quirion

Dr. Rémi Quirion

Chief Scientist of Quebec
Dr. Rémi Quirion, OC, PhD, CQ, FRSC is Québec’s first chief scientist. He chairs the boards of directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec and advises the Minister of Education, Higher Education and Research on research and scientific development issues. Until his appointment... Read More →
avatar for David Schwarz

David Schwarz

Senior Director, Science Policy & Evaluation, Alberta Economic Development & Trade
David Schwarz, Ph.D., is Senior Director of Science Policy and Evaluation within the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade at the Government of Alberta. David is responsible for science and evaluation policies and strategies, and science and innovation funding program development... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

401 – How the culture and structure of science might change to address grand societal challenges/ Comment la culture et la structure de la science peuvent changer pour relever les grands défis sociétaux
Panel Organizer: Dr. Tina McDivitt, Spindle

It is not clear how current organizational, technological and cultural structures of science might provide solutions to complex global issues like climate change, public health and food and water insecurity. This panel will discuss the need for new approaches of scientific research and development to overcome these grand challenges. Focus will be on R&D systems that draw from multiple scientific approaches and engage societies as well as professional and commercial stakeholders in defining the scale, scope and foci of research. Similar systems have sprung and dissipated sporadically in the past to mobilize and effectively act on impending challenges. Highly cited examples include the US Space Programme and the Manhattan Project.
Panelists will outline emerging models of knowledge creation and integration that are cognizant of the non-linear, highly uncertain and high risk nature of true “leaps and bounds” innovation. Discussion will focus on three major topics: 1) the need for transdisciplinary scientific research where traditional disciplines meld through entirely new processes, reward mechanisms and common languages to answer questions that are derived from societal needs. 2) the need for bridging platforms and dedicated resources to enable science-based transformation of industries 3) the need for collaborative networking where knowledge is created, evaluated and distributed through an array of professional groups and commercial, public research and health organizations.

Moderators
avatar for Mark J. Poznansky

Mark J. Poznansky

President and CEO, Ontario Genomics
Mark J. Poznansky has been at Ontario Genomics since 2010. His role at Ontario Genomics draws on his substantive experience in the life sciences and in running institutes and businesses, as well as his knowledge of government affairs and business development.   Previously he ran... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Gordon Kurtenbach

Dr. Gordon Kurtenbach

Head of Autodesk Research, Autodesk
Dr. Gordon Kurtenbach is the head of Autodesk Research (www.autodeskresearch.com), the industrial research group for Autodesk. His group is one of the rare industrial research groups in Canada which has thrived while still being part of a hi-tech Silicon Valley based company. Recently... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Amy Lang

Dr. Amy Lang

Director of Patient, Caregiver and Public Engagement, Health Quality Ontario
Amy Lang is the Director of Patient, Caregiver and Public Engagement for Health Quality Ontario. Amy leads Health Quality Ontario's work to embed patient, caregiver and public perspectives into its reports, recommendations and programs and to support and spread best practices for... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Donald Stuss

Dr. Donald Stuss

Founding Director, founding President and Scientific Director, Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute (RRI), Ontario Brain institute
Dr. Donald Stuss is the Founding Director of Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute (RRI) and founding President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Brain institute. He is an internationally respected neuropsychologist who has expanded scientific understanding of brain function... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:00

Coffee Break/ Pause-café
Thursday November 2, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
GATINEAU 206/208

15:30

101 – Designing the scientific 'paper” of the future/ Concevoir «l’article» scientifique de l’avenir
Panel Organizer: Rebecca Ross, Canadian Science Publishing
Panel Organizer: Rebecca Ross, Canadian Science Publishing

Scientific articles published in science journals have been more or less the same format for the past several hundred years. Despite advances in technology and digital publishing, the scientific article continues to be bound in print traditions. As the vehicle through which all vetted scientific research is communicated to readers, what are the needs of the scientific paper of the future? Who will read it and what does it need to say and do? What elements of the current scientific paper must be preserved for the future? How can today’s scientific journals be improved or expanded to include different types of content for a variety of readers?

In an age of fake news and predatory publishing practices, the role of the publisher is even more important as “gate keepers” of scientific information that has been vetted and reviewed by experts. What is the best way for publishers to foster, preserve, and share the scientific record that leverages the excellence and creative potential of the Canadian scientific enterprise? How can readers best identify trusted sources of scientific information, even without a background in a specific scientific discipline? What changes are required to ensure that scholarly publishing keeps pace with the needs of industry, policy-makers, and the public?

This will also include a discussion regarding the opportunities and challenges of large-scale multidisciplinary research projects. Packaging up these research results to share knowledge back to funders, government, industry, and the general public is an important component of ensuring that Canada obtains the new scientific knowledge that it needs to be prosperous in the future.

The purpose of this panel is to brainstorm the written and graphical outputs of scientific information of the future. The goal is to have an open discussion amongst panelists and with the audience about what kind of content is required to make evidence-based decisions and where that content should live in the online world. Panelists will cover different approaches by publishers to provide lay summaries, article highlights, magazine content, infographics, and other features to collate the content published in scientific articles for a wide readership.

As an interactive component of this session, a graphic recording will be done alongside the presentations and discussion to provide a visual representation and record of the conversation.  This graphical recording will provide a visual element to the session and allow for some of the abstract ideas to be represented on paper for additional connections to be made.

Moderators
avatar for Laura Coristine

Laura Coristine

Scientist, Conservation Biologist and Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow, University of British Columbia
Dr. Laura Coristine is an engaged scientist, conservation biologist, and Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow. She earned her PhD from the University of Ottawa and is currently based at the Department of Biology – University of British Columbia Okanagan Campus. Her research focuses on... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Steven Cooke

Steven Cooke

Professor, Canada Research Chair at Carleton University
Dr. Steven J. Cooke is a Canada Research Chair and Professor at Carleton University in Ottawa.  Although the majority of the research in his lab is focused on fish ecology, physiology, and behaviour, Cooke is also engaged in research on human dimensions, knowledge mobilization, and... Read More →
avatar for Maria DeRosa

Maria DeRosa

Professor, Chemistry Department at Carleton University
Maria DeRosa is a Professor in the Chemistry Department at Carleton University where she is the Principal Investigator for the Canada Foundation for Innovation funded Laboratory for Aptamer Discovery and Development of Emerging Research (LADDER). She is also the Chair for the Partnership... Read More →
avatar for Brian Owens

Brian Owens

Freelance writer and journalist, Nature, New Scientist, Science, and the Canadian Medical Association Journal
Brian Owens is an experienced science journalist and editor who spent 8 years in London, UK working as the online news editor for the leading science journal Nature and as a reporter and news editor for the influential policy magazines Research Fortnight and Research Europe. He now... Read More →
avatar for Chelsea Rochman

Chelsea Rochman

Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
Chelsea Rochman is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto. She received her PhD in Ecology from the University of California, Davis and was a recipient of the Society for Conservation Biology's David H. Smith Postdoctoral Fellowship. Chelsea has been researching the sources... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
ROOM 211 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:30

304-313 (Merged Panel) – Mobilizing Research for Policy Impact/ (Groupe de discussion combiné) – Mobiliser la recherche pour un impact politique
Panel Organizers: Sasha Wood and David Phipps
Panel Organizers: Sasha Wood, New Brunswick Social Policy Research Network and David Phipps, York University

How can we more effectively bring new and existing scientific knowledge to bear on Canada’s challenges?

Researchers are increasingly expected to plan for and report on economic, social and/or environmental impacts in research grant applications. Universities are complementing investments in technology commercialization with supports for knowledge mobilization that more broadly support researchers and their non- academic partners as they collaborate to develop inclusive impacts on professional practice, public policy and social services. Policy makers are exploring innovative methods of policy development. The focus of this panel will be on efforts universities are making to support collaborations with policy makers, and specifically, the role of knowledge brokers and knowledge brokering organizations to make policy impacts. These collaborations are critically important for impact because researchers don’t create policy impacts on their own. Research creates evidence but it is the policy makers that use the evidence as one input into the policy process.

The panel will feature different perspectives on policy research to policy impact processes at both the provincial and federal level. The primary case will be the New Brunswick Social Policy Research Network (NBSPRN). The University of New Brunswick (UNB) hosts NBSPRN on behalf of all four New Brunswick universities and the Government of New Brunswick. Bill MacKenzie (Director of Strategic Partnership, NBSPRN) and Nick Scott (Executive Director of Innovation and Open Government, Government of New Brunswick) will present the case of NBSPRN reflecting on strengths and gaps from each side of the policy research collaboration.

Reflections on NBSPRN will be offered by Moura Quayle (Director, Liu Centre for Global Issues, University of British Columbia) who is working on a proposal for a School of Public Policy and Global Affairs at UBC which will have a mandate for policy impact as well as scholarly excellence. Comments on the role of government and the academy in influencing public policy will be offered by Rodney Ghali (Assistant Secretary of the Innovation Hub at the Privy Council Office). Rodney Ghali leads the PCO Innovation Hub which is experimenting with policy innovation for the federal government including the various contributions academic research and expertise can make to federal policy development

The panel will be moderated by Robert Haché (VP Research & Innovation, York University), Chair of Research Impact Canada, Canada’s knowledge mobilization network representing 12 universities making investments to maximize the impacts of university research. Dr. Haché will lead the panel in discussing ways the academic institution can help researchers and policy partners collaborate to create policy impacts. The panel will explore issues related to planning for impact, barriers and enablers of successful collaboration, research impact assessment and inclusive innovation.

Respondents to the panel will include Cathy Malcolm Edwards, in her role at Carleton University has participating in Research Impact Canada, Canada’s knowledge mobilization network and Matthew McKean, Associate Director of Education at the Conference Board of Canada. Each will reflect briefly on the impact of the panel discussion and the implications to academic (Cathy Edwards) and policy (Matthew McKean) partners. Respondents will set the stage for moderated audience Q&A.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Robert Haché

Dr. Robert Haché

Vice-President Research and Innovation, York University
Dr. Robert Haché is Vice-President Research and Innovation at York University. Prior to that, he served as the associate vice-president research at the University of Calgary, where he was instrumental in moving the university’s strategic research priorities forward. He has also... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Malcolm Edwards

Cathy Malcolm Edwards

Managing Director, 1125@Carleton, Carleton University
With 20 years of experience in research environments, Cathy Malcolm Edwards has an enthusiastic appreciation for the power that research has to improve lives and the world we live in. Her client-centric approach fosters open dialogue, promotes collaborative engagements and encourages... Read More →
avatar for Rodney Ghali

Rodney Ghali

Assistant Secretary of the Innovation Hub, Privy Council Office
Rodney Ghali is the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet of the Innovation Hub at the Privy Council Office, Government of Canada. He is responsible for leading the exploration and execution of new and innovative policy and programmatic approaches, focused on improving impact, accountability... Read More →
avatar for Bill MacKenzie

Bill MacKenzie

Director of Strategic Partnerships, New Brunswick Social Policy Research Network
Prior to his role as Director of Strategic Partnerships with the New Brunswick Social Policy Research Network, Bill has held a number of senior policy and strategic planning roles in the New Brunswick Departments of Agriculture and Social Development. Some of his past experiences... Read More →
avatar for Matthew McKean

Matthew McKean

Associate Director of Education, Conference Board of Canada
Matthew McKean is Associate Director of Education at the Conference Board of Canada. He directs the research program and leads stakeholder relations for the Centre for Skills and Post-Secondary Education, a major five-year initiative that examines the advanced skills and education... Read More →
avatar for Nick Scott

Nick Scott

Executive Director, Open Government and Innovation, Government of New Brunswick
Nick Scott is Executive Director, Open Government and Innovation at the Government of New Brunswick. Most recently he served as Executive Director of the NB Social Policy Research Network; a partnership between the Government of New Brunswick and the province’s Post-Secondary Institutions... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:30

404 – The Canadian Science Policy Fellowship: Lessons from the Inaugural Year/ La bourse pour l’élaboration de politiques scientifiques canadiennes : leçons tirées de l’année d’inauguration
Panel Organizer: Stephen Higham, Mitacs Inc.
Panel Organizer: Stephen Higham, Mitacs Inc.

Last year, in partnership with the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy and participating federal departments and agencies, Mitacs launched the Canadian Science Policy Fellowship. Modeled after the success of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Science and Technology Policy Fellowship and the first of its kind in Canada, the program seeks to build linkages between government decision makers and academic researchers. Researchers take on year-long fellowships with a government host to receive a first-hand introduction to government policymaking processes, while contributing to the scientific priorities of their host office.
This new collaboration reflects a growing emphasis on fostering policy competency amongst Canada’s researchers to help strengthen the role of science in decision making, and to train the next generation of leaders in science policy. While the inaugural cohort of fellows has since completed their fellowships, two new cohorts are beginning another year of placements, with one in Ottawa with the Government of Canada, and the other in Victoria with the Government of British Columbia.
Moderated by a member of the program’s advisory council, which is composed of leading experts in science policy who provide guidance to the program, this panel will be composed of both outgoing and incoming Science Policy Fellows, as well as a representative from a host department from the pilot year. In bringing together these informed perspectives, the panel will foster an exchange of ideas on the role of researchers in policymaking. Outgoing fellows will describe their experiences and observations on the policymaking process, while incoming fellows will outline their initial impressions and expectations for the program. In addition, the host-participant will contribute a broader perspective on the budding value that the program brings to their office and to policymaking, and why they choose to participate.
Questions to be discussed will include:
  • What did you learn about policymaking that you would you like academic researchers to know?
  • Did your experience with government change your view on policymaking?
  • Beyond evidence, what are some key factors that influence policy?
  • How can researchers and policymakers strengthen their ties?

Moderators
avatar for Bonnie Schmidt

Bonnie Schmidt

SPFAC member, Founder and President, Let’s Talk Science
Dr. Bonnie Schmidt is the founder and president of Let’s Talk Science, an award-winning, national charitable organization that helps children and youth fulfill their potential and prepare for their future careers and citizenship role by supporting their learning through science... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Pierre-Olivier Bédard

Pierre-Olivier Bédard

Canadian Science Policy Fellow, Global Affairs Canada
Pierre-Olivier holds a PhD in political science from Université Laval and completed a two-year SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship at Durham University (UK). During his fellowship, Pierre-Olivier was a member of the Centre for Humanities Engaging Science and Society and the Centre for... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Girling

Kimberly Girling

Canadian Science Policy Fellow, Defence Research and Development Canada
Dr. Kimberly Girling holds a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of British Columbia, where she studied new therapeutics for Huntington's Disease, a neurodegenerative illness.  Kimberly was a member of the inaugural cohort of the Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellowship. Through... Read More →
avatar for Loren Matheson

Loren Matheson

Canadian Science Policy Fellowship host, Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Loren Matheson is a science advisor within the Office of the Chief Science Operating Officer at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Loren holds a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Ottawa and spent her post-doctoral time at the University of Saskatchewan. After 10 years... Read More →
avatar for Mahlet N. Mesfin

Mahlet N. Mesfin

Deputy Director, Center for Science Diplomacy, Office of International Security and International Affairs American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Dr. Mahlet Mesfin, Ph.D, is the Deputy Director of the AAAS Center for Science Diplomacy and former Assistant Director for International Science and Technology at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She is an alumna of the AAAS Science & Technology Fellowship... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:30

420 – When Technologies Meet: Challenges And Opportunities for Canada in An Era of Technology Convergence/ Carrefour technologique : défis et occasions pour le Canada au sein d’une période de convergence des technologies
Organizer: Toni Glick, Stella Jiang and Chris Lau  |  Ontario 

Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science



Transformative technologies are advancing at an unprecedented pace, with the potential to have a massive impact on society, the economy and our environment. Convergences in areas like Artificial Intelligence, genomics, and quantum computing can unlock solutions to some of our biggest challenges, from improving services in remote communities to predicting and even curing diseases.
It’s critical for scientists, businesses and policymakers to join forces to chart the best course forward in this unfamiliar terrain. This panel will bring together great minds to discuss their experiences, ideas and emerging best practices from around the world. 

Moderators
avatar for David Ticoll

David Ticoll

Director Emeritus, Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC)
Distinguished Fellow, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Director Emeritus, Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC) and Special Advisor, ITAC Talent | David Ticoll is a Canadian and international authority on the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Kauth

Kathleen Kauth

Director of Partnerships, Advanced Energy Centre, MaRS
Kathleen Kauth is the Director of Partnerships for the Advanced Energy Centre (AEC) at MaRS. She works with energy industry stakeholders to cooperatively facilitate the adoption of innovation in the energy system.  Prior to joining the AEC, Kathleen worked at Blackstone Energy Solutions... Read More →
avatar for Irene Sterian

Irene Sterian

President and CEO, ReMAP
Irene Sterian is the Executive Director and architect of a $19M Business-led Network of Centres of Excellence (BL-NCE) for renewable energy, new materials and optics & photonics. Driven by her passion for innovation, Irene is a master collaborator. Together with dozens of start-ups... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Duncan Stewart

Dr. Duncan Stewart

General Manager, Security and disruptive technologies, National Research Council Canada
Dr. Duncan Stewart is a physicist and engineer with a passion for innovation in the public interest.  He leads the National Research Council of Canada’s Security and Disruptive Technology research centre, a 100 person physics and chemistry team with the mandate to develop longer... Read More →
avatar for Michael Tremblay

Michael Tremblay

President and CEO, Invest Ottawa & Bayview Yards
Michael Tremblay joined Invest Ottawa as President and Chief Executive Officer in March of 2017. Mike’s mandate was recently expanded to include Bayview Yards. Prior to joining Invest Ottawa, he was the Vice President of Public Sector for Microsoft Canada from April 2007. Michael... Read More →
avatar for Iliana Oris Valiente

Iliana Oris Valiente

Founder, ColliderX
Founder, ColliderX Managing Director and Global Blockchain Innovation Lead, Accenture | Iliana Oris Valiente, CPA, CA, CBP (Certified Bitcoin Professional) is widely credited for being a trailblazer in the blockchain space, having been among the first to recognize the tremendous... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:30

504-510 – Changing perceptions: engaging the public with scientists in the era of alternative facts/ Changer les perceptions : susciter la participation du public auprès des scientifiques en période de faits alternatifs
Panel Organizers: Jesse Rogerson, Canada Aviation Space Museum and Stephanie Deschenes, Canadian Association of Science Centres

According to the report Science Culture Canada (Council of Canadian Academies,2014),Canadians in general have a very positive attitude toward science and technology. With42% of us having a basic level of scientific literacy, Canada is ranked first among 35 countries.However, a later survey by the Ontario Science Centre found that, though most Canadiansbelieve they are science literate and use science to form opinions, a high proportion said theyfelt that the science of climate change is unclear (35%), that vaccines are linked to autism (18%)and that genetically modified organisms are not good for our health (57%). In this time of“alternative facts,” it is more important than ever to engage citizens in the understanding of thescientific process by which facts are established.

Classically, museums and science centres would showcase, through exhibits, artifacts, andprogramming, various scientific principles and phenomenon. The classic scientific researchinstitutions would employ scientists to develop their research and answer fundamental orapplied scientific questions. The gap between knowledge generation and knowledge transferpartially contributes to misconceptions in the public’s mind about who scientists are, how theyemploy the scientific method to answer questions, and how modern scientific research is carriedout. In an effort to reduce this metaphorical and physical gap between scientific inquiry and thepublic, many cultural institutions have begun developing programs that incorporate scientistsinto the museum experience.

This session will look at how Canada’s science centres and museums a) use the science behindscience communication to encourage audiences to look deeper at the plethora of informationavailable to form opinions based on fact; b) develop partnerships with other STEM-basedorganizations, the research community, academia and industry to engage Canadians of all ageswith an end goal of increasing science literacy; and c) demonstrate how delegates can developsimilar partnerships to help battle the era of “alternative facts” using solid science.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Jesse Rogerson

Dr. Jesse Rogerson

Science Advisor, Canada Aviation and Space Museum
Jesse Rogerson is an avid science communicator, particularly in the fields of astronomy, aviation, and space sciences. He received his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from York University in 2016. While there, he contributed heavily to the education and public outreach programming at the University’s... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Chantal Barriault

Dr. Chantal Barriault

Director, Science Communication Graduate Program, Laurentian University and Science North
Dr. Barriault leads the only Science Communication Graduate Program of its kind in Canada, offered jointly by Laurentian University and Science North. She spent most of her early career working at Science North where she led many science communication projects. Now a master lecturer... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Deschenes

Stephanie Deschenes

Executive Director, Canadian Association of Science Centres
Stephanie Deschenes is the Executive Director for the Canadian Association of Science Centres,a member-based organization representing 50 science centres, science museums, Planetariums and aquariums across Canada. Ms. Deschenes is responsible for government advocacy, partnership development... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Marianne Mader

Dr. Marianne Mader

Managing Director, Royal Ontario Museum
Dr. Marianne Mader is a Planetary Scientist, Science Communicator, a Managing Director at the Royal Ontario Museum, and Co-Founder of the STEAMLabs community makerspace in Toronto. At the ROM, Marianne develops engagement strategies, leading multidisciplinary initiatives to help people... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rachel Ward-Maxwell

Dr. Rachel Ward-Maxwell

Research/Programmer, Astronomy and Space Science, Ontario Science Centre
Dr. Rachel Ward-Maxwell received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from McMaster University. During her academic career she has consistently developed new and interesting outreach initiatives, such as within the York University Astronomical Observatory and Sidewalk Astronomy with McMaster... Read More →


Thursday November 2, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

17:00

18:00

 
Friday, November 3
 

07:45

University Intramural Research Collaboration/ Collaboration de recherche intramurale universitaire
Join Mr. Iain Stewart, President of the National Research Council for a discussion regarding university - intramural research collaborations: collaborative successes and challenges, and future directions for the National Research Council in this regard.

Speakers
avatar for Iain Stewart

Iain Stewart

President, National Research Council Canada
Iain Stewart was appointed President of the National Research Council (NRC) effective August 24, 2016. | | Prior to that, Mr. Stewart served as Associate Secretary of the Treasury Board of Canada from July 2015 to August 2016, and Assistant Secretary of the International Affairs... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 07:45 - 08:25
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

08:30

Addressing Major Global Challenges through Science and Public Policy: Transdisciplinary and Multidimensional Approaches/ Relever les principaux défis mondiaux par l’entremise de la science et de la politique publique
Addressing Major Global Challenges through Science and Public Policy: Transdisciplinary and Multidimensional Approaches 
Relever les principaux défis mondiaux par l’entremise de la science et de la politique publique: Approches transdisciplinaires et multidimensionnelles 

Panel Organizers: Gordon McBean and Anne Ballantyne | International Council for Science and Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP), JSGS, and University of Saskatchewan

The UN 2030 Agenda and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals reflect a wide range of large-scale or so-called “wicked” problems linked to the management and sustainability of our environment, natural resources, health and economic systems. Dealing with such challenges requires new approaches for decision-makers in pursuit of effective evidence-based policy solutions. These are problems for which there are many legitimate viewpoints and a variety of economic, social, political, cultural, and moral dimensions. Often there is uncertainty regarding the sources of the problem, as well as the most effective goals, methods and partnerships for its resolution. These challenges require the convergence and integration of disciplinary excellence across the full spectrum of sciences – natural, socio-economic, humanities, engineering and health - to inform comprehensive and effective transdisciplinary solutions. Beyond this however, the role and effectiveness of science and innovation in large-scale change are often questioned.  Canada must strengthen its science-policy dialogue.  While research illuminates causal relationships and engenders solutions to complex problems, the academy alone is limited in its ability to impact public, policy and industry opinions and perspectives.
Enhancing the science-policy interface is critical for addressing wicked and unwieldly problems. Transdisciplinary research must be integrated within a broader range of multi-sectoral, multi-dimensional and multi-level governance.  Strategies must incorporate the perspectives, expertise and authority of numerous players and organizations, including from all levels of government, industry, communities, and academic and research institutions.  But how do we ensure an effective science-policy interface amidst federal, provincial & territorial interactions that necessitate alignment of regional interests?  Given decision-making occurs across complex and contested spheres, what are the optimal ways to enhance cooperation across diverse governance forms?  How do we integrate research within government and private sector strategies while respecting their unique priorities and mandates?   
This session will focus on research and partnership-building at the science-policy interface.  Brief presentations by experts and practitioners from government, academia and industry will include case studies involving transdisciplinary and multidimensional collaboration to highlight lessons learned for sectors like health, the environment and the biosciences. A facilitated exchange among panelists and the audience will target constructive policy solutions for complex multi-sectoral challenges, focusing on supporting policy development through knowledge that integrates both science and political considerations with all their interdependencies and tensions.

Moderators
avatar for Gordon McBean

Gordon McBean

President, International Council for Science (ICSU)
Professor Gordon McBean CM, OOnt, PhD, FRSC is President of the International Council for Science (ICSU), Co-Chair of the Governing Council for Future Earth: Research for Global Sustainability, Professor Emeritus of Geography and Adjunct Research Professor in Departments of Geography... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Charmaine B. Dean

Charmaine B. Dean

Vice President of Research, University of Waterloo
Professor Charmaine B. Dean was appointed as University of Waterloo Vice-President, university research beginning a five-year term on July 1, 2017.   Dean, an alumnus of Waterloo, is currently professor and Dean of the Faculty of Science at Western University.  Dr. Dean’s leadership... Read More →
avatar for Janet Halliwell

Janet Halliwell

Principal, JE Halliwell Associates Inc.
Janet Halliwell is the Principal of JE Halliwell Associates Inc., a company offering value-added services in policy and management consultancy relating to post-secondary education and science and technology, particularly publicly-funded R&D.  Janet has extensive experience in S&T... Read More →
avatar for Margot Hurlbert

Margot Hurlbert

Proficient Lawyer, Professor, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina
Margot Hurlbert is a Professor at Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy and is the Lead of the Science, Technology and Innovation Research Cluster at the University of Regina campus of the Policy school. Margot holds a B. Admin. (Great Distinction) from the University... Read More →
avatar for Jerome Konescni

Jerome Konescni

Executive-in-Residence, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan
Jerome Konecsni is an entrepreneur, a seasoned corporate professional, an executive public sector manager, a former teacher, and an Executive-in –Residence with the Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan Campus and an Advisor with the Centre... Read More →
avatar for Amy Luers

Amy Luers

Executive Director, Research for Global Sustainability Programme, Future Earth
Dr. Amy Luers is now the Executive Director, Future Earth: Research for Global Sustainability Programme.  Before joining Future Earth she was at the Skoll Global Threats Fund (SGTF) where she directed the climate and water programs.  Previously, she was the Assistant Director for... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rémi Quirion

Dr. Rémi Quirion

Chief Scientist of Quebec
Dr. Rémi Quirion, OC, PhD, CQ, FRSC is Québec’s first chief scientist. He chairs the boards of directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec and advises the Minister of Education, Higher Education and Research on research and scientific development issues. Until his appointment... Read More →
avatar for Peggy Schmeiser

Peggy Schmeiser

Associate Director and Co-founder, Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy
Dr. Peggy Schmeiser is Associate Director and co-founder of the Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy and an Assistant Professor at the Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S).  She teaches and conducts research... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 08:30 - 10:00
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:00

10:30

315 – Immigration, integration and the production and utilization of scientific knowledge: What are Canada’s challenges?/ Immigration, intégration, production et utilisation des connaissances scientifiques : À quels défis fait face le Canada?
Panel organizer: Martin Taylor, CRDCN

What is known about the contributions of migrants in the science and technology fields and in innovation and how strong is the evidence?  What are the sources of this knowledge and what new initiatives exist in data collection that will extend our insights? What are best practices in immigration and integration policies which can maximize the contributions of migrants in science and innovation? What new directions are emerging in the immigration and integration arenas and how will these contribute to the growth of scientific knowledge in Canada?   
Under the sponsorship of the Canadian Research Data Centre Network (CRDCN; www.crdcn.org), these questions are addressed in this panel by experts in data development, immigration policy, the recruitment of highly skilled STEM trained workers, and labour market integration issues. The panel builds upon the evidence base generated from advanced statistical research conducted by CRDCN researchers drawing upon the rich Statistics Canada data files made available through the CRDCN’s Research Data Centres. It also anticipates CRDCN’s future research directions under its program of collaborative policy-relevant research programs in the theme area of Immigration and Settlement.
The context for the panel’s discussion is the recognition that a strong knowledge economy, one focused on innovation and intensive use of technology, is linked to positive economic growth, higher standards of living, growth in productivity, and enhanced environmental and social well-being. Understandably, stimulating innovation and productivity are the objectives of many policies advanced by federal, provincial and territorial governments, the nonprofit sector, and business communities. Immigration policies can also further the intertwined goals of innovation, productivity and maintaining Canada’s competitive edge in today’s global economy.  
Today’s immigration policy emphasizes the recruitment of the world’s best and brightest as permanent residents, as international students and as temporary workers. Migrants contribute to Canada’s economy by virtue of being highly educated and or by their training in the STEM fields and their entrepreneurship in generating new firms and products. That said, the full utilization of migrant skills can be dampened by barriers associated with language and re-accreditation requirements, by low take-up rates of international students for permanent residency, and by policies that influence which temporary workers transition to permanent resident status. The panel will explore these issues in depth, sharing both what the data tells us about recent trends and offering suggestions for how Canada can better leverage the skills of new immigrants and migrants for the well-being of all Canadians.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Michelle Gauthier

Dr. Michelle Gauthier

Special Advisor, Canadian Research Data Centre Network
For more than 25 years, Michelle has dedicated her professional energy to connecting people and ideas across geography, languages, cultures and sectors for the public good. She currently works as an independent consultant and Special Advisor to leaders in the charitable and non-profit... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jane Badets

Jane Badets

Assistant Chief Statistician, Social, Health and Labour Field, Statistics Canada
Since 2015, Ms. Badets has held the position of Assistant Chief Statistician, Social, Health and Labour Field at Statistics Canada where she has responsibility for a broad range of social statistics including health, justice, education, labour, income, immigration, Aboriginal Peoples... Read More →
avatar for Ümit Kiziltan

Ümit Kiziltan

Director General, Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada
Ümit Kiziltan has taught graduate and undergraduate courses on research methods, sociology of education, and comparative education at Bogaziçi University, Syracuse University, and the University of Victoria. He has worked more than a decade in northern British Columbia with the... Read More →
avatar for Ravi Pendakur

Ravi Pendakur

Professor of Public and International Affairs, University of Ottawa
Prior to joining the University of Ottawa as professor of Public and International Affairs, Ravi spent 18 years as a researcher in a number of federal departments including, The Secretary of State, Multiculturalism and Citizenship, Canadian Heritage, and, Human Resources and Social... Read More →
avatar for Arthur Sweetman

Arthur Sweetman

Professor, Department of Economics, McMaster University
Arthur Sweetman is a Professor in the Department of Economics at McMaster University in Canada where he holds the Ontario Research Chair in Health Human Resources. Economic and policy issues related to Canadian immigration are among the areas in which he conducts research. In 2016... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

320 – The Internationalization of Canadian Science: Challenges and Opportunities/ L’internationalisation de la science canadienne : défis et occasions
Panel Organizers: Daryl Copeland, CGAI and U of M CERIUM and Mehrdad Hariri, CSPC
Panel Organizers: Daryl Copeland, CGAI and U of M CERIUM and Mehrdad Hariri,  Canadian Science Policy Centre

In an age of uncertainty and rising populist and nationalist sentiments, science represents a positive and powerful driver of prosperity, security, development and progress. Many countries, including Canada's competitors,  have moved to put into place international science policies and programs which respond to the evolving operating environment. Canadian performance, however, has been mixed, and new directions and initiatives must be undertaken if Canada's place in the globalizing world of international science cooperation is to be ensured.

Canada retains substantial scientific capacity and potential, residing mainly in various levels of government, academia, research institutes, and specialized NGOs. Key players could expand their engagement in collaborative efforts to address the vexing range of "wicked", transnational, S&T-driven issues, ranging from climate change and pandemic disease to food and water insecurity, urbanization and declining biodiversity. Special opportunities exist for Canada to demonstrate leadership the emerging field of science diplomacy, for instance in efforts to better manage the global commons and achieve the UN SDGs, but re-investment and new partnerships will be essential. 

This panel will review the record to date, provide a comparative perspective, survey best practices and present options and recommendations for future action.


Moderators
avatar for Jane Barratt

Jane Barratt

Secretary General, International Federation on Ageing
Dr Barratt is the Secretary General of the International Federation on Ageing (IFA) comprising government, industry, academia and non-governmental members in 73 countries and representing some 75 million older people. The IFA is a global point of connection of experts and expertise... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Daryl Copeland

Daryl Copeland

Research fellow and Policy fellow, CGAI and U of M CERIUM
Daryl Copeland is an educator, analyst, consultant and former Canadian diplomat.  He is the author of Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations (Lynne Reinner 2009), a Research Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute,  a Policy Fellow at the University... Read More →
avatar for Paul Dufour

Paul Dufour

Co-chair, Science Integrity Project
Paul Dufour was educated in science policy and history of science and technology at McGill, Concordia and Université de Montréal. He is adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy and Principal of PaulicyWorks, a science and technology... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Pavel Kabat

Dr. Pavel Kabat

Director General and Chief Executive Officer, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
Professor Kabat is director general and chief executive officer of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), an independent, international, science, and science-to-policy institute. IIASA has 24 member countries, nearly 400 international staff, and a global... Read More →
avatar for Chibulu Luo

Chibulu Luo

PhD Candidate, University of Toronto, Department of Civil Engineering
Chibulu is a PhD Candidate in Civil Engineering at the University of Toronto. Her research investigates the linkages between sustainable infrastructure design and urban planning in rapidly growing Sub-Saharan African cities, including strategies for enhancing urban resilience and... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 211 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

405 – Open science and innovation (45 minutes) / Science ouverte et innovation (45 minutes)
Panel Organizer: Tiberius Brastaviceanu, ACES-CAKE
Panel Organizer: Tiberius Brastaviceanu, ACES-CAKE

Canada hosts some of the most ambitious pilot projects in open science and open innovation. The problem is that all these initiatives are poorly known and understood, especially those that did not emerge within traditional institutions, which are in fact the most disruptive ones. In this Case Study panel we discuss a few special open science projects that have originated within open innovation networks, and have been conducted in collaboration with forward-looking academic labs. The panelists will present the methodologies, the infrastructure for collaboration and the governance that have been employed, the resulting benefits, and will analyse some of the problems encountered. These cases constitute a great example of how academia can interface with open networks and communities.

Online communities and networks have become environments buzzing with scientific and technological activities. It is nowadays normal for a graduate student to work in a lab by day and contribute to online communities by night, or spend their evenings in open innovation spaces such as fablabs, makerspaces, and hackerspaces. It is also not a secret any more that students turn to their online peers for technical questions and advice, rather than to their lab colleagues and professors. The most prolific students are those who maintain complex relationships outside of the immediate academic circle. The boundaries of academia are becoming very fuzzy, but there is very little effort to formalize these exchanges between academic labs and online communities/networks, and open innovation spaces.

The cases that will be presented and discussed during this panel will show how interfaces between academia and open innovation communities/networks accelerate scientific discovery and technological transfer.

By presenting and discussing these cases we hope to stimulate other labs to experiment with relations with open innovation networks. At a higher level, we also hope to influence Universities to put in place pilot programs to begin formalizing these kind of relations. SENSORICA affiliates can work with different academic players to transfer their knowledge and know how. 

Moderators
avatar for Tiberius Brastaviceanu

Tiberius Brastaviceanu

Co-founder, SENSORICA
Tiberius Brastaviceanu is one of the main architects of the Open Value Network (OVN) model, a new form of organization capable of delivering innovation to market in an open and decentralized way, suited for the emerging collaborative or participatory economy. The OVN model is now... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fabio Balli

Fabio Balli

Co-founder, Breathing Games
Fabio Balli leads Breathing Games, an international initiative that mobilizes citizens around the participatory creation and research of respiratory health technologies and knowledge. | | This open access commons aims to reduce the increasing burden of chronic respiratory diseases... Read More →
avatar for Maria Frangos

Maria Frangos

Affiliate & UX Product Designer (Core Development Team member), SENSORICA and Breathing Games
Maria is a user experience designer with twenty years experience, where she engages in both practice-based work and design research. Maria holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design and a Masters of Design in Industrial Design. She has presented at numerous international design conferences... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

408 – The scientific and economic benefits of Open Science (45 minutes) / Les avantages scientifiques et économiques de la science ouverte (45 minutes)
Panel Organizer: Arij Al Chawaf, SGC and Annabel Seyller, Tanenbaum Open Science Institute
Panel Organizer: Arij Al Chawaf, Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) and  Annabel Seyller, Tanenbaum Open Science Institute at The Montreal Neurological Institute

How can Canada better deal with complex challenges that have stumped the scientific and innovation communities? With Open Science.
Open Science’s principles of unrestricted access to data, ideas, results and materials allows multidisciplinary and cross-sector collaborations to transcend intellectual property restrictions in favour of speed of communication and transparency.  Canada has been leading the Open Science movement, with open science projects such as the SGC, launched in 2004, and open science institutions, such as the Tannenbaum Open Science Initiative at the Montreal Neurological Institute, launched in 2016.
In this panel, representatives from academia, industry and policy will address how Open Science can help strengthen the environment and integration of new scientific knowledge by responding to questions such as: 
Reproducibility is identified as a big issue in scientific research. How can open science help?
Open science prevents translation of scientific discoveries into commercial revenue. True or false?
How can Canada continue to lead and create impact from the Open Science movement?  How can government, policy makers and institutions help create social and economic value from open science? 

Moderators
avatar for Aled Edwards

Aled Edwards

CEO, Structural Genomics Consortium
Dr. Aled Edwards is founding and current CEO of the SGC, and on Faculty at the University of Toronto, Oxford and McGill. Founded in 2003, the SGC is a UK-based charity that is led from Canada, and is considered one of the pioneers of open science.  With ~300 scientists in its laboratories... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Edwards

Elizabeth Edwards

Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, and Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto
Dr. Elizabeth Edwards holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Chemical Engineering from McGill University, Montreal, and a PhD degree (1993) in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University.  She is internationally known for her work on anaerobic bioremediation... Read More →
avatar for Lizabeth Leveille

Lizabeth Leveille

Associate Vice President and Head, Boston Innovation Hub BD&L, Merck Research Laboratories
Liz brings over 15 years industry experience and over the past 12 years has focused her work in business development at large pharmaceutical companies.  She is currently the Head of the Merck Boston Innovation Hub, which is a Business Development & Licensing team focused on early-stage... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rémi Quirion

Dr. Rémi Quirion

Chief Scientist of Quebec
Dr. Rémi Quirion, OC, PhD, CQ, FRSC is Québec’s first chief scientist. He chairs the boards of directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec and advises the Minister of Education, Higher Education and Research on research and scientific development issues. Until his appointment... Read More →
avatar for Guy Rouleau

Guy Rouleau

Chair of the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University
Chairholder of the Wilder Penfield Chair in Neuroscience Director of the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital Chair of the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University Interim Director of the Department of Medical Genetics at McGill University Health... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

501 – Science Slam: An Interactive Framework for Engaging the Public in Canadian Science/ Science Slam : Un cadre interactif pour susciter la participation du public dans la science canadienne
Panel Organizer: Alan Shapiro, Science Slam Canada
Panel Organizer: Alan Shapiro, Science Slam Canada

Based on the format of a poetry slam, a science slam is a competition that allows a range of scientific knowledge holders, including professors, researchers, students, and educators to share a topic of interest with a general audience and be judged on their communications skills.
Science slams have been popular in Europe for more than a decade but have only recently gained traction in North America. Science Slam Canada was founded in 2016 and now runs quarterly science slams in Vancouver. Given rapid growth and broad interest, Science Slam Canada is in the process of expanding to other cities across Canada.
Competitors have five minutes to present on any science topic and are judged based on communication skills, audience engagement, and scientific accuracy. The first speaker is designated a ‘sacrificial slammer’ and serves to set the baseline for scoring. Presentations are delivered to a live audience and are adjudicated by judges selected for their background in science and science communication. Past judges have included university professors, industry scientists, educators, science media personalities, and improvisers.
Because of the focus on communication, knowledge holders are not limited in their choice of topic; past presentations have ranged from graduate students speaking about their own research to educators sharing their topics of interest. Unique to Science Slam Canada, use of a projector or slideshow is not allowed, but props and creative presentation styles are encouraged.

Moderators
avatar for Nikki Berreth

Nikki Berreth

Co-Founder & Science Communication Specialist, Science Slam Canada & LitScientist
Nikki Berreth is a science communicator and educator living in Vancouver, Canada. With a background in science and the fine arts, she is always looking for new ways to relay both scientific and technical knowledge to her intended audience; as a result, Nikki has co-founded several... Read More →
avatar for Alan Shapiro

Alan Shapiro

Co-Founder & Science Communication Specialist, Science Slam Canada & LitScientist
Alan Shapiro is a Vancouver-based environmental professional and science communicator. He is co-founder and host of Science Slam, a competition where scientists, students, and educators share their science with the public and are judged on communication skills and audience engagement... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Irem Bor-Yaliniz

Irem Bor-Yaliniz

Graduate student, Carleton University
Irem Bor-Yaliniz is currently pursuing her doctorate degree at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. She received scholarships through the Engage grant of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) in 2014, and the Queen Elizabeth II Scholarship in Science... Read More →
avatar for Masha Cemma

Masha Cemma

Canadian Science Policy Fellow, Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Masha Cemma is passionate about using science and policy to protect people and animals around the world from deadly infectious diseases. She holds a PhD in Molecular Genetics from the University of Toronto, where she examined how mammalian cells defend themselves against invading... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Girling

Kimberly Girling

Canadian Science Policy Fellow, Defence Research and Development Canada
Dr. Kimberly Girling holds a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of British Columbia, where she studied new therapeutics for Huntington's Disease, a neurodegenerative illness.  Kimberly was a member of the inaugural cohort of the Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellowship. Through... Read More →
avatar for Danny Jomaa

Danny Jomaa

Graduate Student, University of Ottawa
Danny Jomaa is a graduate student at the University of Ottawa, where he researches ways to stop brain cancer in its tracks (quite literally) and delves into science communication and policy on the side. In his undergraduate years, Danny worked in advocacy for the intersection of physical... Read More →
avatar for Aybuke Ozel

Aybuke Ozel

Undergraduate student, University of Ottawa
Aybuke Ozel is a fourth year civil engineering student at the University of Ottawa. She is passionate about inspiring youth with STEM. This summer, Aybuke has been working as an outreach instructor in Nunavut running STEM workshops and summer camps with Actua Canada. She is involved... Read More →
avatar for Peter Soroye

Peter Soroye

Graduate student, University of Ottawa
Peter Soroye is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Ottawa, studying the effects of climate change and land-use change on bumblebee communities world-wide. I was pulled into STEM research by a love of the natural world, a passion for discovery and a desire to help develop... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515 – Short Talks Series/ Série de brefs exposés Organized by CSPC
Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-1 – Lessons learned from the US White House on using science to meet policy challenges/ Leçons apprises de la Maison-Blanche américaine sur le recours à la science pour satisfaire aux défis politiques
Scientific and technological advice is important in policymaking. The talk will provide real examples and lessons learned at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) during the U.S. Obama Administration on what a science-advice organization should look like.

Speakers
avatar for Kei Koizumi

Kei Koizumi

Visiting scholar, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Kei Koizumi is a Visiting Scholar in Science Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He joined AAAS in February 2017 after 8 years as Assistant Director for Federal Research and Development and Senior Advisor for the National Science and Technology... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-2 – Lessons Learned: Immersion in Policy-making for Scientists and Engineers/ Leçons apprises : immersion en élaboration de politiques pour les scientifiques et les ingénieurs Panel Organizer: Mahlet N. Mesfin
Panel Organizer: Mahlet N. Mesfin | Office of International Security and International Affairs American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

AAAS has recently completed a study, supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, to understand the international landscape and success factors for implementing science policy fellowship programs and other strategies to increase connections and foster relationships between scientists and policymakers across the globe. This session will feature an overview of the report findings and recommendations on ways to support and enhance engagement of scientists in policy making at the federal and state levels through fellowships and other science policy immersion mechanisms.mah

Speakers
avatar for Mahlet N. Mesfin

Mahlet N. Mesfin

Deputy Director, Center for Science Diplomacy, Office of International Security and International Affairs American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Dr. Mahlet Mesfin, Ph.D, is the Deputy Director of the AAAS Center for Science Diplomacy and former Assistant Director for International Science and Technology at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She is an alumna of the AAAS Science & Technology Fellowship... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-3 – Global Perspectives on AMR Innovation: What Does this Mean for Canada?/ Points de vue mondiaux sur l’innovatino en matière de résistance aux antimicrobiens : qu’est-ce que cela signifie pour le Canada?
Panel Organizers: Dani Peters and Robert Livingston | Organization: Merck 

Over the past several years, attention paid to the issue of antimicrobial resistance has grown significantly, both by international organizations (WHO, FAO, G20, G7) and Canadian allies (notably United States, UK and EU). In Canada, government officials have been engaged in various international forums on AMR, while AMR stakeholders outside of government have focused attention within domestic forums. At the international level, there tends to be an emphasis on new solutions for tackling AMR, in areas that include stewardship, economic incentives and research. However, there is a gap in translating those ideas to suit a Canadian context. As such, there may be benefit to supporting engagement between Canadian stakeholders in AMR and AMR experts from international organizations and other nations. It is worth noting that Canada will assume chair for G7 in 2018 and AMR has served as a priority topic for the G7 in recent years. For this reason, bridging ties between AMR leaders at the international level and those in Canada could enhance Canada’s capacity to demonstrate international leadership on the issue in the coming years.



Speakers
avatar for Nicole Mahoney

Nicole Mahoney

Director of Government Affairs & Regulatory Policy, Merck & Co.
Nicole Mahoney is the Director of Government Affairs & Regulatory Policy at Cubist, a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck, where she focuses on U.S. and international regulatory policy, with a particular emphasis on antibiotics and resistance. She works with a variety of stakeholders... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-4 – Breaking down barriers for science outreach/ Éliminer les obstacles qui nuisent à la sensibilisation à la science
Let’s Talk Science Outreach coordinators are post-secondary students who facilitate the outreach taking place in classrooms and community events across Canada. Together, they lead thousands of volunteers who in 2016 reached more than 260,000 youth and 62,000 members of the general public.
In a time when “alternative facts” abound, it is more important than ever that the public understands the value of science, and the need for research in evidence-based policy. Outreach provides a platform for scientists to engage the public in their research and help them understand the nature of science. While many traditional obstacles related to outreach have disappeared, several remain.
In this talk Melissa Mathers, a site outreach coordinator from York University, will provide insight into the barriers outreach scientists are currently facing, and how they can be overcome. She will discuss the value of science outreach to youth, the public, and also to post-secondary volunteers and the institutions to which they belong.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Mathers

Melissa Mathers

Data Manager, STAO
I'm a recent MSc graduate from York University where I studied antimatter at CERN. I'm now an Assistant Regional Coordinator at Let's Talk Science, an organization I started volunteering with in 2013. This is my first year working on the STAO Professional Learning Team!


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-5 – How to ensure the transparency of scientific study designs, their conduct, and reporting/ Comment assurer la transparence des modèles d’études scientifiques, leur déroulement et les rapports
Rigour in the design, conduct, and reporting of scientific studies are cornerstones of the scientific method. However, recently much has been written about “problems in science”, in particular in regards to lack of transparency and irreproducible research (e.g. the reproducibility crisis). A number of high profile calls to action for better transparency in science and science decision-making have been voiced. Some stakeholders including journals, research institutions, and funders have started to adopt policy changes in an effort to drive improvements. However, it is unclear whether decisions to implement such changes are evidence-based, or if these changes will be effective and meaningful. In this talk, I will provide an overview of these issues, and discuss how we can ensure quality by strengthening the environment that we are producing scientific knowledge and related scientific policy. I will emphasize the need to develop evidence-based interventions to address these “problems in science”, as well as the importance of establishing monitoring frameworks to ensure we are achieving what we set out to.
Topics that will be discussed include: 1) the utility of a priori study registration and funder mandates for open access reporting; 2) deficiencies in the design and reporting of research, and lack of training on these topics; 3) how the current system of incentive and rewards in academia requires evaluation to ensure it is promoting the highest quality science.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Cobey

Kelly Cobey

Senior Clinical Research Associate, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, University of Stirling
Dr. Cobey is a Senior Clinical Research Associate in Centre for Journalology at the Ottawa Methods Centre of The Ottawa Hospital. In her capacity as Publications Officer she provides educational outreach on best practice in academic biomedical publishing. Kelly also consults with... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-6 – Data Science and Social Implications/ Science des données et implications sociales
A hallmark of our age is the ubiquity of data — informing advances in every field of research, in government, private and public health, and in industry. The emerging field of data science focuses on the complex issues involved in acquiring, protecting, sharing, learning from, and communicating about data. This multi-disciplinary activity combines aspects of computer science, statistics, and mathematics, working in collaboration with scientists, social scientists and humanists. This short talk reports on recent achievements in advancing the science of data as an intellectual endeavour. There are common themes that arise in diverse data-rich domains, some of which pose serious challenges including privacy and security of data, fairness and transparency of algorithms, data veracity and representativeness, the benefits and risks of open data, and many important considerations in management, modelling and visualization.r

Speakers
avatar for Raymond T. Ng

Raymond T. Ng

Professor of Computer Science and Chief Informatics Officer, University of British Columbia and PROOF (Prevention of Organ Failure) Centre
Professor Raymond Ng is the Scientific Director of the Data Science Institute at the University of British Columbia and the Chief Informatics Officer in the Prevention of Organ Failure Centre at St. Paul’s Hospital.  He has throughout his career emphasized the importance of learning... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

10:30

515-7 – Open Science is the New Normal for Knowledge Dissemination/ La science ouverte est la nouvelle norme pour la transmission du savoir
In 2016 the European Commission made a commitment to Open Science as the default approach to the dissemination of knowledge by 2020, with a focus on projects receiving funding from the Horizon 2020 funding envelope. Other jurisdictions, such as Australia, are also embracing this approach. In Canada, the support for Open Science as a default is nascent, best represented by individual projects like the one recently announced by the Montreal Neurological Institute. The MNI has committed to release all research and data emerging from their efforts as open data by default for 5 years, placing them in the lead in Canada in providing an exemplar for Open Science. In another example the Governments of Canada and many Provinces have committed to providing access to Open Data as a default approach to government generated/supported data, which is increasingly driving innovation in research and economic development. The approach in publicly funded research still tends to be Closed by Default, although this is changing as domains require the deposit of research data with publications, and as nations develop deposit mandates. The Open Data Institute has suggested that access to open data results in a 0.5% increase in GDP, which in Canada's case would mean a $60 Billion impact. On the other hand, spin-off and licensing revenue generated by Canada's universities in 2014 was $62 Million. Given this stark contrast between traditional and emerging approaches to accessibility to data, and the different impacts on economic development, a change in Canada's policy framework to embrace open data stands to have a huge impact on the Canadian economy.
This talk will provide the context in Canada as well as internationally, and discuss the opportunities and challenges to adopt an "Open by Default" approach to the dissemination of publicly funded research.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Leggott

Mark Leggott

Executive Director, Research Data Canada
As Executive Director of Research Data Canada, Mark builds on the existing progress of RDC and facilitates broad stakeholder outreach to launch programs that strengthen Canada’s research data management capacity. Before joining CANARIE, Mark enjoyed a successful academic career... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

12:00

Lunch/ Dîner
Friday November 3, 2017 12:00 - 13:30
GATINEAU 206/208

12:30

The Fundamental Science Review: Perspectives as of November 2017/ Examen de la science fondamentale : perspectives à compter de novembre 2017
This session will take stock of where we are six months following publication of the major report of the Advisory Panel on Federal Support for Fundamental Science. Four members of the Panel will speak to and engage in discussion on, why the recommendations were framed as they were and what they see as significant issues and next steps.

Moderators
avatar for Janet Halliwell

Janet Halliwell

Principal, JE Halliwell Associates Inc.
Janet Halliwell is the Principal of JE Halliwell Associates Inc., a company offering value-added services in policy and management consultancy relating to post-secondary education and science and technology, particularly publicly-funded R&D.  Janet has extensive experience in S&T... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Martha Crago

Dr. Martha Crago

Vice- Principal of Research and Innovation, McGill University
Professor Martha Crago began her five-year mandate as McGill University’s Vice-Principal (Research and Innovation) on July 1, 2017. Prior to returning to McGill, Professor Crago was the Vice-President (Research) and Professor in Human Communications Disorders at Dalhousie University. Her... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Art McDonald

Dr. Art McDonald

Professor Emeritus, Queen’s University, Nobel Laureate (physics 2015)
Arthur B. McDonald Art McDonald, CC, O. Ont, O. N.S., FRS, FRSC, P. Eng, is a native of Sydney, N.S. Canada. He has degrees in physics from Dalhousie University (BSc, MSc) and Caltech (PhD) and twelve honorary degrees. From 1969-1982 he was a Research Officer at AECL Chalk River... Read More →
avatar for Dr. David Naylor

Dr. David Naylor

Professor of Medicine and President Emeritus, University of Toronto
David Naylor is a professor of medicine and president emeritus at the University of Toronto. He received his MD from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Medicine in 1978 with scholarships in medicine, surgery and pediatrics, and his D. Phil. as a Rhodes Scholar in the Faculty of... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rémi Quirion

Dr. Rémi Quirion

Chief Scientist of Quebec
Dr. Rémi Quirion, OC, PhD, CQ, FRSC is Québec’s first chief scientist. He chairs the boards of directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec and advises the Minister of Education, Higher Education and Research on research and scientific development issues. Until his appointment... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 12:30 - 13:30
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

104 – “Missing Numbers”: How girls and women can help solve Canada's innovation crisis/ « Nombres manquants » : comment les jeunes filles et les femmes peuvent contribuer à la résolution de la crise en matière d’innovation au Canada
Panel Organizers: Teddy Katz and Dr. Betsy McGregor  | SHAD

“Missing Numbers” will explore how Canada can rethink its policies to more fully equip and empower girls and women to help solve its innovation crisis over the next 50 years. Despite Canada’s impressive resources, our country falls short in punching above its weight as a global leader solving the compelling challenges the world currently faces.

Through powerful personal stories of ‘Trail-blazers’ and ‘Path-makers’, this panel will shed light on hurdles still confronting some of Canada’s best and brightest girls and women in STEMM – and some policy strategies to close the gender gap, strengthen diversity and achieve inclusiveness in firing up Canada’s innovation performance.

A survey by Microsoft found young girls in Europe become interested in STEM subjects around 11 but then lose interest at around 15. A couple of the issues noted were a lack of female role models in STEM subjects, a need for mentors and a need for more hands-on STEM experiences inside and outside the classroom.

SHAD is a case study that meets this challenge head-on in Canada. Mentoring 16,000 young Canadians over 37 years in its summer programs on university campuses nationally, SHAD has produced 32 Rhodes Scholars and multiple Science Fair winners.  Close to 60 percent of its participants the past 3 years have been girls. The majority go on to study STEM in university.
“Missing Numbers” SHAD panel includes four up-and-coming ‘Pathmakers’ and SHAD students - or Fellows as they’re known - Emily Cross, Winnica Beltrano, Amanda Adam and Bethel Samson.  Their stories speak powerfully to persisting bias, hurdles of race and obstacles in rural and remote communities. Equally, each speaks to solutions, inspiring mentors and a shared optimism for a future where their energy and talent can reach its full potential.  

‘Trailblazer’ Melanie Martin, Professor of Physics who is forging a career at the frontier of MRI technology, will address opportunities and challenges girls face entering careers in STEM and address what Canada needs to do more of to foster more diversity in groups of researchers to make scientific breakthroughs.  Erin Engelhardt is a patent agent and the program director of SHAD at Carleton University. As a patent agent, Erin positions Canadian inventors and small companies for success through strategic development of their patent portfolios. Erin’s ‘Shadditude’ formula reaches for a vision of inclusiveness that inspires.

‘Trailblazer’ Paulina Cameron a Director of Futurpreneur in BC and the Yukon will speak to coding, mentorship and global issues and challenges where Canada could become a leader with a strengthened role for girls and women at the frontiers of innovation. First Nation engineer and professor Sarah Gauthier grounds her presentation in the reality of being a breakthrough leader in her community. She raises our sights to actions embedded in the Truth and Reconciliation Report and shines light on the unmet power of matching Canada’s ‘Western Science’ with respect and learning from Indigenous and Local Systems of Knowledge.
 

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Betsy McGregor

Dr. Betsy McGregor

Founder and Facilitator (Global Leader in Advancement of Youth and Women), McGregor Leadership
Dr. Elizabeth (Betsy) McGregor is a global thought leader in the fields of science policy, ethics, gender and youth leadership. A former Fellow of the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Medical School where she coordinated an international working group on science and ethics, Dr... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Adam

Amanda Adam

High School Student, Member of 771 All Girls Robotics Team, Student Leader of her school’s STEMR Department, St. Mildred’s- Lightbourn School
Amanda Adam is a Grade 11 academic student at St. Mildred’s- Lightbourn School in Oakville, Ontario. Amanda is the incoming elected student leader of her school's STEMR (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, and Robotics) department, the Co-Lead and Co-Founder of her school's... Read More →
avatar for Winnica Beltrano

Winnica Beltrano

University Student, Canada-Wide Science Fair Award Winner, University of Calgary
Winnica is a second-year student at the University of Calgary who loves keeping herself busy with the world around her. As an out-of-province student from Winnipeg pursuing a Bachelor of Health Sciences in Biomedical Science, Winnica finds enjoyment in exploring different regions... Read More →
avatar for Paulina Cameron

Paulina Cameron

Expert Panel on Youth Employment, Director, Futurpreneur BC
Paulina in an impact-driven leader. She is the Director for BC & Yukon at Futurpreneur Canada- a national NPO providing early stage resources, mentorship, and financing to startup entrepreneurs aged 18-39. Paulina also currently serves on the Government of Canada’s Expert Panel... Read More →
avatar for Emily Cross

Emily Cross

High School Student, Canada-Wide Science Fair Award Winner
Emily is an internationally recognized youth researcher, science mentor and public speaker whose research focus is geoscience.  She has won over 30 science awards and medals, including The Sigma Xi Society global High School Geoscience Medal, American Geoscience Institute Special... Read More →
avatar for Erin Engelhardt

Erin Engelhardt

Program Director of SHAD, Carleton University
Erin Engelhardt is a patent agent and the program director of SHAD at Carleton University. As a patent agent, Erin positions Canadian inventors and small companies for success through strategic development of their patent portfolios. In her spare time, Erin loves to make, learn... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Gauthier

Sarah Gauthier

Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan
Sarah Gauthier is a professional engineer who has spent her career focused in the areas of water resources, water treatment, and the environment. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil, Geological, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Melanie Martin

Dr. Melanie Martin

Professor of Physics, University of Winnipeg
Dr. Melanie Martin graduated with a BSc (Hons) in Physics from University of Manitoba. She then went on to obtain an MS, MPhil and a PhD in Applied Physics and Biomedical Engineering from Yale University. She was a postdoctoral scholar and an associate scientist in Biology at Caltech... Read More →
avatar for Bethel Samson

Bethel Samson

International Baccalaureate Program High School Student – Summer intern, Megbare Senay Hospital and Addis Ababa University of Pharmacy (SHAD 2017)
Bethel Samson is a grade 11 student at Colonel By Secondary School in the International Baccalaureate Diplomat Program.  Over the past few years, she has competed and consistently won a variety of math and physics contests, and leads the math club and debate clubs at her school... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
GATINEAU – ROOM 205/207 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

316 – Science for Decision Making at Fisheries and Oceans Canada: The Past, Present, and Future / La science pour la prise de décisions à Pêches et Océans Canada : le passé, le présent et le futur
Panel Organizer: Sophie Foster, Fisheries and Oceans, Ottawa

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has an established science advisory process, known as the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS) process.  The goal of Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s (DFO) science peer review and advisory processes is to provide high quality scientific advice and information through rigorous peer review with the overall objective of providing the best possible science advice to the Minister, managers, stakeholders and the public.  Peer review meetings are used as a forum for review and challenge of scientific information leading to objective consensus to address specific objectives. Participation is by invitation and participants are chosen for their knowledge on the topic under review.  
The panel will explore the origins, current practises, challenges and visions for the future from the perspectives of DFO Science, DFO management, and academia.

Moderators
avatar for Sophie Foster

Sophie Foster

Acting Director, Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, Fisheries and Oceans, Ottawa
Sophie Foster is the Acting Director for the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat at Fisheries and Oceans in Ottawa. Ms. Foster began her career in the Federal Public Service in 2008 with Fisheries and Oceans Canada as a Policy Analyst in International Fisheries and Oceans Policy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Steven Cooke

Steven Cooke

Professor, Canada Research Chair at Carleton University
Dr. Steven J. Cooke is a Canada Research Chair and Professor at Carleton University in Ottawa.  Although the majority of the research in his lab is focused on fish ecology, physiology, and behaviour, Cooke is also engaged in research on human dimensions, knowledge mobilization, and... Read More →
avatar for Suzuette S. Soomai

Suzuette S. Soomai

Postdoctoral Fellow, Dalhousie University
Suzuette S. Soomai is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Environmental Information: Use and Influence research program (EIUI) at Dalhousie University. She examined fisheries information use in decision-making in Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization... Read More →
avatar for Nicholas Winfield

Nicholas Winfield

Director General, Ecosystems Management, Ecosystems and Fisheries Management, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada
Mr. Nicholas Winfield is the Director General, Ecosystems Management, Ecosystems and Fisheries Management, at DFO. Mr. Winfield began his career in the Federal Public Service in 1995 with Fisheries and Oceans Canada as a Habitat Biologist in the Pacific Region. He then became a Senior... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 209 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

409 – Realizing the Impact Chain - from Knowledge Mobilization to Impact/ Concrétiser la chaîne d’impacts, de la mobilisation des connaissances à l’impact
Panel Organizer: Eddy Nason, Ontario SPOR Support Unit
Panel Organizer: Eddy Nason, Ontario SPOR Support Unit

Increasingly, jurisdictions around the world are moving towards an accountability climate that requires an understanding of science policy impacts, particularly research funding impacts. Where some jurisdictions have identified an approach based on retrospective analysis of existing impacts from science (for example the UK and their Research Excellence Framework - REF), others such as Canada have taken more of a prospective approach to mobilizing knowledge towards certain desired impacts.
In this session, a panel of four high profile speakers in impact, knowledge mobilization and the use of impact information for science will discuss the ways Canada can take a more holistic approach to realizing the impact chain and measuring progress along it. This will include reflection on international experiences in measuring impacts and knowledge mobilization approaches, and how these approaches have been utilized in Canada to the benefit of science policy and the research system.
By initially laying out the different approaches taken to research and science impact in different countries, the panel will explore the values underlying different approaches to impact assessment. For example, in the UK REF, investigating the rationale for a retrospective approach in terms of both the history of impact assessment in UK science, and the value-proposition of impact information there. For the Canadian knowledge mobilization approach, identifying why Canadian science has taken this approach to identifying potential impacts. The panel will also investigate the potential overlap between the two approaches and when and why a combined approach may be of value.
The panel will also provide deep contextual detail on the current value of impact assessment of science to both decision makers (provincially and federally) and those in the science world (including researchers, funders and scientific research oversight bodies) – providing a more nuanced understanding of how any new approaches to assessing the impact of science could meet the needs of the multiple stakeholders in Canadian science.
In short, this panel has the capacity to look at the when, why and how of impact – and to provide some guidance on what next.

Moderators
avatar for Eddy Nason

Eddy Nason

Assistant Director, Ontario SPOR SUPPORT Unit
Eddy Nason is an expert in research impact assessment and research systems, and has over 10 years of experience working in think-tanks and academic organizations providing research, analysis, evaluation and advice on research policy, strategy, evaluation and funding approaches to... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jane Barratt

Jane Barratt

Secretary General, International Federation on Ageing
Dr Barratt is the Secretary General of the International Federation on Ageing (IFA) comprising government, industry, academia and non-governmental members in 73 countries and representing some 75 million older people. The IFA is a global point of connection of experts and expertise... Read More →
avatar for David Budtz Pedersen

David Budtz Pedersen

Professor and Co-Director of the Humanomics Research Centre, Aalborg University
David Budtz Pedersen is Professor and Co-Director of the Humanomics Research Centre, Aalborg University, Denmark. His research focuses on science and higher education policy, impact assessment, and science-based policy-making. Dr. Budtz Pedersen is Strategic Adviser to the Danish... Read More →
avatar for David Phipps

David Phipps

Executive Director, Research & Innovation Services, Division of Vice-President Research & Innovation / Office of Research Services, York University
Dr. Phipps manages all research grants and agreements including knowledge and technology transfer for York University as well as York’s award winning Knowledge Mobilization Unit. In addition to other awards and recognition he has been named the most influential knowledge mobilizer... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Rémi Quirion

Dr. Rémi Quirion

Chief Scientist of Quebec
Dr. Rémi Quirion, OC, PhD, CQ, FRSC is Québec’s first chief scientist. He chairs the boards of directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec and advises the Minister of Education, Higher Education and Research on research and scientific development issues. Until his appointment... Read More →


Friday November 3, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 210 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

13:30

508 – Engaging the public where they live: perspectives from media personalities and strategists for better science communication/ Susciter la participation du public dans son environnement : points de vue de personnalités médiatiques et stratèges
508 – Engaging the public where they live: perspectives from media personalities and strategists for better science communication 
508 – Susciter la participation du public dans son environnement : points de vue de personnalités médiatiques et stratèges pour une meilleure communication de la science 

Panel Organizer: Shawn McGuirk & Vanessa Sung, Science & Policy Exchange

The steadily declining perception of science in the media has now become a critical and worldwide issue, fueled by the viral spread of pseudoscience and “fake news” in an era where misinformation is prevalent. It has become necessary to enact new and more informed strategies to engage the public on a large scale, to break the stereotype of the “elite” scientist, and to communicate the importance of evidence, consensus, and the scientific method.
Our panel of media strategists and science communicators will describe their success in reaching the public on various media platforms (Twitter, podcasts, television, etc.) as well as how they believe scientists and policy makers can leverage new media to reinvigorate public interest and engagement in science and evidence. To maximize interactions between panelists and the audience, 45-60 minutes will be dedicated to a moderated discussion and question period. The strength of this panel firmly resides in establishing a dialogue between these media experts and our audience of established and aspiring science policy experts at CSPC, and we are confident that this exchange will yield viable and valuable strategies.
The intended outcomes are to generate a set of concrete strategies with which scientists and policy-makers alike can deploy to (1) increase their social media presence in an impactful way, (2) communicate information more effectively to wider audiences, and (3) translate online interactions into more active engagement from the public. These will be communicated broadly through universities, provincial and federal agencies, and other interest groups following CSPC.
Science & Policy Exchange is a non-profit advocacy group run by graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in Montreal, whose aims are two-fold: (1) to foster the student voice in evidence-based decision making and (2) to bring together leading experts from academia, industry, and government to engage and inform students and the public on issues at the interface of science and policy.

Moderators
avatar for Nora Young

Nora Young

Host, CBC Radio’s Spark
Nora Young is the host and the creator of Spark, CBC’s national radio show and podcast about technology and culture. Spark is a fun and informative look at new technology, with an eye to understanding how it is changing our relationships, our work, and our culture. She was the founding... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Blevis

Mark Blevis

President and Digital Public Affairs Strategist, Full Duplex Ltd
Mark Blevis specializes in online reputation management, crisis communication and advocacy. He has provided strategic counsel to companies and organizations in the high-tech, financial services, natural resources, emergency services, energy, healthcare, pharmaceutical and publishing... Read More →
avatar for Pascal Lapointe

Pascal Lapointe

Editor-in-chief, L'Agence Science Presse
Pascal Lapointe has been a science journalist for 25 years and is editor-in-chief of Agence Science-Presse, a non-profit Quebec media that feeds other news media on science. Exploring the links between science and politics, the Agence Science-Presse has broadcast since 2008 its radio... Read More →
avatar for Alyssa Lerner

Alyssa Lerner

Senior Editor, SciShow
Alyssa Lerner is Senior Editor at SciShow, one of YouTube’s leading sources for science news and information. With equal parts skepticism and enthusiasm, SciShow explores the surprising and exciting realities of our universe. Since it began in 2012, SciShow has grown to more than... Read More →
avatar for Kirstine Stewart

Kirstine Stewart

Chief Strategy Officer, Diply
Chief Strategy Officer at Diply, previously VP Media North America at Twitter and General Manager at CBC Television


Friday November 3, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
ROOM 212 Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2

15:00

CSPC Featured Panel; Details to Be Announced/ Groupe de discussion de la CPSC; informations à venir
Friday November 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
OTTAWA SALON Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2